Designalog

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Posts Tagged ‘Washington’

* Residential Architecture: Capitol Hill Residence by Balance Associates Architects

Posted by the editors on Thursday, 18 October 2012

Residential Architecture: Capitol Hill Residence by Balance Associates Architects: “..With a compact form and several integrated sustainable systems, the Capitol Hill Residence achieves the client’s goals to maximize the site’s views and resources while responding to its micro climate.  Some of the sustainable systems are architectural in nature. For example, the roof rainwater collects into a steel entry water feature, day light from a typical overcast Seattle sky penetrates deep into the house through a central translucent slot, and exterior mounted mechanical shades prevent excessive heat gain without sacrificing the view.  Hidden systems affect the energy consumption of the house  such as the buried geothermal wells and heat pumps that aid in both heating and cooling, and a 30 panel photovoltaic system mounted on the roof feeds electricity back to the grid..The minimal foundation sits within the footprint of the previous house, while the upper floors cantilever off the foundation as if to float above the front entry water feature and surrounding landscape. The house is divided by a sloped translucent ceiling that contains the main circulation space and stair allowing daylight deep into the core. Acrylic cantilevered treads with glazed guards and railings keep the visual appearance of the stair light and airy allowing the living and dining spaces to flow together..While the footprint and overall form of the Capitol Hill Residence were shaped by the restrictions of the site, the architectural and mechanical systems at work define the aesthetic. Working closely with a team of engineers, landscape architects, and solar designers we were able to arrive at an elegant, environmentally sustainable home that achieves the needs of the clients, and fits within the context of the site and surrounding community..”  Extensive glazing, natural light; interesting interior volumes and materials; sustainability..

See our posts on five other homes by Balance Associates Architects:

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image: © Steve Keating Photography; Cifuentes , Fabian . “Capitol Hill Residence / Balance Associates Architects” 15 Oct 2012. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/281447&gt;

 

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture, Sustainable Architecture, Sustainable Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: The Ellis Residence by Coates Design

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 23 September 2012

Residential Architecture: The Ellis Residence by Coates Design: “..Perched high on a Bainbridge Island bluff, this magnificent home enjoys unique views of Puget  Sound from Mount Rainier to Mount Baker. The home is unique in other ways as well: it’s the first  LEED Platinum residence in Washington  State (USA) that’s outside of Seattle. Elegant and educational. Modern and motivating. Stunning and sustainable. Joanne and Ed Ellis  wanted to create a home that all of these things and more..Architect Mathew Coates, president of Coates Design Architects of Seattle and Bainbridge Island, was determined that the Ellis’ home would have a commitment to sustainability from start to finish.  “This is a new way of building that requires a new process,” he said. “You can’t look at building a  green home like you do a conventional home and just slap all this green stuff on it.” The commitment started with the homeowners and architect, but the contractor and  subcontractors  also had to be “all in”.  “Their willingness to alter decades of traditional construction and learn sustainable construction practices was paramount to the success of the project,” said Coates. Coates made sure that the project’s ecologically small footprint went well beyond just the construction of the Ellis’ new home..The site had an existing structure on it that was carefully taken apart and recycled, effectively diverting 98% of its building material from the landfill. Before construction began, subcontractors created detailed lists of framing and sheathing to more accurately place their lumber orders to reduce waste. Additionally, the contractor tracked all waste and recyclable material on the site to provide a 75% landfill diversion rate. Interior trim and stair material originated from site - milled fir  trees that were fallen from a neighbor’s property. The site was rehabilitated with native and drought tolerant vegetation and pervious pavers. The crest  of the bluff was restored with plantings to reestablish habitat and to prevent erosion. Extreme care was taken to preserve natural habitat and existing trees throughout the construction process..The entire house is oriented to capture sun and shade and designed to passively heat and cool itself. The home also has a wide range of features to increase energy productivity including geothermal heat, photovoltaic energy collection, solar hot water, thermal massing and heat - recovery technologies. Additional key features include: two 1,500 - gallon rainwater collection cisterns, radiant  floor heating, site - milled wood trim, triple - glazed windows and a vegetated roof..A large east - west “spine” forms a central thermal mass core for the house. This massive wall reduces temperature swings and is oriented in conjunction with operable skylights to take advantage of cooling techniques. In addition, this wall sets up a division between private and public spaces. To the north, the private portion of the house is much more enclosed. To the south, the glassy public  spaces have abundant natural light and views. To the east, the water side of the house, windows and  doors open to allow the naturally cool breezes from the Sound to temper the interior spaces. Coates also created spaces with multiple functions in order to achieve a smaller overall footprint. For  example, the washer and dryer and clothing storage are built into the master bathroom casework and there’s an office tucked into a corner of the media room. The home’s roof became a vegetated garden patio providing a place to relax - and greater insulation. There are also sliding and bi - folding doors that transform smaller rooms into larger gathering spaces that can be easily connected to the outdoors..“Every room in the house serves at least two functions, and usually four or five,” said Coates. Coates’ commitment to going green paid off: the 2,500 sf home uses 70% less energy than a typical comparably - sized home..The Ellis ’ home shows that sustainability and a love of modern design aren’t mutually exclusive.“ We wanted to prove that modern, gracious residential design could encompass local environmental concerns and state - of - the - art energy efficiency,” said Joanne Ellis. “Matthew and his team far exceeded our goals.” The home serves as a model and educational tool for future sustainable residential projects. During construction and after they moved in, the Ellis’ hosted open houses to inspire others to embrace sustainability. Coates is a sought - after speaker and lecturer and the Ellis’ often join him to relate their experiences to a wider audience. “It became obvious early on that Joanne and Ed wanted to do more than just build green,” Coates recalled. “They are active role models for sustainable  living.”..  Interesting form, interior volumes and details, materiality; LEED Platinum, sustainability; green roof..

image: © Roger Turk; article: Arthitectural

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Green Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture, Solar Design, Sustainable Architecture, Sustainable Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Foster Loop House by Balance Associates Architects

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 1 September 2012

Residential Architecture: Foster Loop House by Balance Associates Architects: “..Located in Mazama, Washington, USA, the site was enjoyed for many years as a campground by the family. The design minimizes impact to the environment by raising parts of the residence off the ground with small concrete piers. The entry to the house is a slightly elevated walk that leads to the entry and stair. This entry opens up to a 1 1/2 story living space and kitchen which are anchored by a centrally located fireplace and the stair. This stair leads to the “tent like” bedrooms with low walls on the second floor. Both ends of the residence have indoor/outdoor spaces. There is also a deck and elevated catwalk that runs between the trees, across a small valley, and empties onto a grassy clearing in the woods where the family used to camp..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, nature views; balconies, terraces; horizontal wood cladding, exposed wood beams and rafters; interesting interior volumes..

See our posts on three other homes by Balance Associates Architects:

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image: © Steve Keating Photography; article: “Foster Loop / Balance Associates Architects” 19 Dec 2011. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/192465&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Sneeoosh Cabin by Zeroplus Architects

Posted by the editors on Thursday, 23 August 2012

Residential Architecture: Sneeoosh Cabin by Zeroplus Architects: “..Zeroplus Architects designed the Sneeoosh Cabin in Puget Sound, Washington, USA..Like a rabbit warming itself in the sun, the Sneeoosh cabin is the underbrush at the waters edge near Deception Pass on the Swinomish Indian Reserve. The dynamic quality of the surrounding landscape becomes integral to daily rituals..With its glass enclosure, the main living space is exposed to both the forest and larger views of the sound, Hope Island, Whidbey Island and the Olympic Mountains beyond. The upper floor, tucked beneath the overscaled protective roof, is highly insular and protective by contrast and houses private sleeping spaces.. Constructed to be minimally disruptive to the forest vegetation and its inhabitants, its innovative structural system limits its impact upon the environment while futhering our ongoing studies of lightness and adaptability in architecture..”  Truly extensive glazing, natural light, nature views; interesting dropped skirt roof and interior volumes; abundant wood; contextual sensibility..

image: Courtesy of Zeroplus Architects; article: Contemporist

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Cultural Architecture, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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