Designalog

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Posts Tagged ‘Wood Cladding’

* Residential Architecture: Queenscliff Residence by John Wardle Architects

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 12 May 2013

Queenscliff Residence by John Wardle Architects

Residential Architecture: Queenscliff Residence by John Wardle Architects: “..This house acts as an optical instrument, a series of devices that frame views beyond the abutting foreshore to the south toward the Heads of Port Phillip Bay (Queenscliff, Victoria, Australia).  The most significant promenade through the site, and house itself, takes you from the street along a gently stepped path to the entry stair which then elevates you sufficiently to appreciate the view as you arrive at the uppermost level.  The careful choreography of this sequence is amplified by materiality and adjacencies.  Fine timber detailing alongside the path, woven wicker within the stair and Calacatta marble in the kitchen.  The experience on entry is private and cocooned from the exterior.  Once above, the views expand and are focussed on the horizon of the ocean to the south..A challenge for Victorian coastal houses is to reconcile the southern views with northern solar orientation. In this instance, a courtyard has been introduced to gain northern aspect to the living spaces and to capture the afternoon sun within an environment shielded from the strong southerlies. The principal bedroom is oriented south stealing ocean views through the main living pavilion and across the courtyard..The house is carefully zoned to allow for privacy between parents and adult children on a narrow site. The main living and dining space is where family and friends come together. In this way, the house is designed for a busy family life, allowing for both privacy and communal gathering.. The direct visual connection between the interior and the sea encourages the contemplation of ships crossing the Heads en route to distant ports, a relaxing retreat from work..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, astounding sea views; interesting form, timber cladding and screening, interior volumes, materiality, contextuality..

See our post on another home by John Wardle Architects: Residential Architecture: Shearers’ Quarters House by John Wardle Architects

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image: © Trevor Mein; article: “Queenscliff Residence / John Wardle Architects” 07 May 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Furniture, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, lighting, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Caxinas House by AUZprojekt

Posted by the editors on Tuesday, 9 April 2013

Caxinas House by AUZprojekt

Residential Architecture: Caxinas House by AUZprojekt: “..portuguese practice AUZprojekt has just shared with us images of their newest renovation in the small fishing town of vila do conde, Portugal, in a very dense urban context. the narrow rectangular plot contains an internal courtyard towards the back end and dictates the type and use of vertical circulation so as not to intrude excessively in the limited width available. a wing along the back side of the main volume extends the living areas that open to the private patio and creates another terrace on its rooftop..”  Interesting interior volumes and details..

image: courtesy of AUZprojekt; article: Designboom

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Posted in Designalog, Architecture, Design, contemporary design, Interiors, Contemporary Architecture, Architects, Residential Architecture, Architecture + Design, Interior Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Hawthbush Extension by Mole Architects

Posted by the editors on Tuesday, 5 March 2013

Hawthbush Extension by Mole Architects

Residential Architecture:  Hawthbush Extension by Mole Architects: “..UK firm Mole Architects extended a protected farmhouse in south-east England by adding an extension with a barrel-vaulted roof that references local agricultural buildings..Located in the High Weald area of the Sussex Downs, the Hawthbush extension replaced several earlier additions constructed in the 1970s..The new structure was placed at an angle to the existing house and visually separated from it by a glass link to replicate the layout of traditional local farmsteads, according to recent research carried out using historical maps of the area..Associating the design with this research allowed them to gain planning permission where previous proposals had failed. This apparent separation also helps to reduce the scale of the additional volume, giving prominence to the original house..When briefing Mole Architects, one of their clients presented the designers with a pot instead of a room schedule, underlining their wish to gain “a beautifully finished object carefully made from ‘natural’ materials”..A coated steel roof arches over courses of bricks reclaimed from a nearby farmhouse, reinterpreting the barrelled structural language of local agricultural buildings..The concave ceiling that results from the unusually shaped roof is emphasised by internal horizontal cladding, directing attention towards a semi-circular window at the end of the master bedroom on the first floor..Whilst the bedroom’s picture window frames the sunrise, the kitchen on the ground floor benefits from the skewed angle of the extension, which orientates the kitchen on the ground floor towards the south so it’s flooded with sunlight during the day. The kitchen can be opened up to the garden with timber-framed glass doors that concertina out onto the patio..This ongoing project also includes spatial reorganisation of the interior of the old farmhouse as well as a sustainable development strategy that affects a broader collection of buildings in the farmyard..Hawthbush farmhouse extension was shortlisted for AJ Small Projects award 2013, which was won by Laura Dewe Mathews for her Gingerbread House. The Forest Pond House folly by TDO was also nominated for this award..Other projects by Mole Architects include a refurbishment of a 1960s bungalow in Cambridgeshire and a house set within the Suffolk dunes designed in collabouration with Jarmund/Vigsnæs Architects..”

See our post on another home by Mole Architects: Residential Architecture: The Lanes by Mole Architects.

image: copyright David Butler; article: Dezeen

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Awards, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: North Fitzroy House by AM Architecture

Posted by the editors on Thursday, 21 February 2013

North Fitzroy House by AM Architecture

Residential Architecture: North Fitzroy House by AM Architecture: “..The owners approached us with a common question. Is it feasible to extend a semi-detached dwelling on a narrow site? The benefit this property had over comparable detached dwellings was the opportunity to build two levels directly on the party wall. This opened up an array of spatial possibilities allowing a ground floor extension of a new kitchen, dining, meals and living, and on the first floor, a master bed, workstation and en-suite..The response to the heritage overlay was one of complimentary difference. We searched for forms and materials that would create a relationship with the existing building but ultimately end up in a contemporary expression that would make no apology for being new. The resultant form is a black, single pitched volume that extrudes along the site reflecting same angle as the existing tiled roof, and switching dramatically in direction at the rear, responding to adjoining neighbours sun access and opening up to a north facing rear garden..The materials and new colours from the existing heritage portico are used internally and externally in the new addition. These common materials serve to bind the two parts together, reinforcing the idea that both old and new, so different in era and style, are borne of the same substance. An important part of the owners brief was a separate dining area screened from the kitchen that would still maintain a spatial connection. This is the first space entered when leaving the old building. It is intended as a night time space, being the deepest into the site and is surrounded by a tactile combination of materials including white bagged brickwork referencing the face brickwork at the front of the building, white painted timber cladding connecting to the painted timber soffit of the portico, glossy white steel plate, exposed polished concrete, charcoal timber shiplap cladding and a timber veneer drinks cabinet. During the day, skylights and long windows wash perpendicular walls, so the space receives a reflected and ambient glow of light..At the core of the extension is the kitchen with void above, which connects a first floor master bedroom and en-suite in a lofty mezzanine. The kitchen is a timber insertion into a white space, and includes a solid timber island bench that doubles as a meals table connecting directly to the living area. A double height wall alongside the stair has large windows placed at the north end to flood it with clear and coloured light, and a long window running the entire western side, creates ever-changing patterns of direct and reflected light throughout the afternoon and evening. The living area is fully glazed to the northern garden and the first floor the en-suite above sits in a deep white recess for privacy, enjoying a high pitching ceiling that opens the space up to the sky and nearby trees ..The design was the product of a fluid working relationship between the clients and architect with the clients embracing new ideas with enthusiasm. Good communication between everyone led to a pleasurable design process and a building that emerged on the other side with its integrity intact. The extension that eventuated from what was a narrow site feels spatially generous and tactile materials combined with ever-changing qualities of light have created a series of interconnected spaces that are a pleasure to spend time in..”  Extensive glazing, natural light; interesting form, interior volumes, fenestration and materiality..

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image: © Dianna Snape; article: “North Fitzroy House / AM Architecture” 18 Feb 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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