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Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

* Architecture: Crescent House by Andrew Burns Architect

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 27 April 2013

Crescent House by Andrew Burns Architect

Architecture: Crescent House by Andrew Burns Architect: “..‘Crescent House’ is the first in an annual series of temporary pavilions to be installed at Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation in Paddington, Sydney, Australia. The aim of this ‘Fugitive Structures’ program is to engage a wide audience with architectural thought..Two arcs are set within an apparently simple rectilinear form. The arcs bisect, creating a pair of infinitely sharp points and a threshold to the space beyond. This combination of fragility and robustness seeks to charge the conversations within the space with a particular quality..The structure has an ambiguous presence; between architecture and art object. Through framing, it transforms an ordinary rose apple hedge into a landscape of beauty. The pavilion responds to elemental themes; darkness and light, the wonder offered by the night sky and the burnt quality of yaki-sugi (charred cedar) recalling the presence of bushfires on this continent..The pavilion and has been initiated and supported by Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation, BVN Donovan Hill, Andrew Cameron Family Foundation and the Nelson Meers Foundation..”

See our post on other work by Andrew Burns Architect: Architecture: Australia House Gallery and Studio by Andrew Burns.

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image: © Brett Boardman; article: “Crescent House / Andrew Burns Architect” 17 Apr 2013. ArchDaily

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* Residential Architecture: Garden Tree House by Hironaka Ogawa & Associates

Posted by the editors on Monday, 4 March 2013

Garden Tree House by Hironaka Ogawa & Associates

Residential Architecture: Garden Tree House by Hironaka Ogawa & Associates: “..This is an extension project on a thirty-five year-old house for a daughter and her husband..A zelkova tree and a Camphor tree stood on the site since the time the main house was built thirty-five years ago.  Removing these trees was one of the design requirements because the new additional building could not be built if these trees remained.  When I received the offer for the project, I thought of various designs before I visited the site for the first time.  However, all my thoughts were blown away as soon as I saw the site in person..The two trees stood there quite strongly. I listen to the stories in detail; the daughter has memories of climbing these trees when she was little..These trees looked over the family for thirty-five years.  They colored the garden and grew up with the family.  Therefore, utilizing these trees and creating a new place for the client became the main theme for the design..In detail, I cut the two trees with their branches intact.  Then I reduced the water content by smoking and drying them for two weeks.  Thereafter, I placed the trees where they used to stand and used them as main structural columns in the center of the living room, dining room, and kitchen..In order to mimic the way the trees used to stand, I sunk the building addition 70 centimeters down in the ground.  I kept the height of the addition lower than the main house while still maintaining 4 meter (ndlr: 13.12 ft) ceiling height..By the way, the smoking and drying process was done at a kiln within Kagawa prefecture.  These two trees returned to the site without ever leaving the prefecture..The client asked a Shinto priest at the nearby shrine to remove evil when the trees were cut.  Nobody would go that far without a love and attachment to these trees..When this house is demolished and another new building constructed by a descendant of the client hundreds of years from now, surely these two trees will be reused in some kind of form..”  Ample glazing, natural light; interesting materiality, interior volumes, and, especially, a wonderful sense of poetry and connection…

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image: © Daici Ano; article: “Garden Tree House / Hironaka Ogawa & Associates” 27 Feb 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Art, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Architecture: ‘The Artistic and the Beautiful’: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Wide-Ranging Views (audio interview)

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 3 March 2013

The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

Architecture: ‘The Artistic and the Beautiful’: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Wide-Ranging Views (audio interview): “..In 1957, two years before his death, Frank Lloyd Wright sat down with WNYC (ndlr: radio) to discuss his design philosophy, exhibiting his trademark eloquence and blistering opinions. The year of this interview marks an explosion of commissions for Wright, who by then had been practicing architecture for 70 years..

Wright mainly designed homes until 1957-58, when he took on 90 new projects, many for public buildings. Over all, Wright’s last decade was his most prolific, accounting for nearly one-third of his oeuvre. This interview was recorded in his Plaza Hotel apartment where he’d moved two years earlier in order to oversee construction of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, on which he had been working for 14 years. Here, Wright neatly dismisses the project’s many critics, promising “…a new point of view…it’s going to be so enlivening and refreshing that it will make some of these painters quite ashamed of the protest that they issued against it.”

In this interview, Wright also expresses distaste for the nascent designs of Sydney Opera House, as well as the U.S. Air Force Academy structure, whose designers he lambasts as “Poetry Crushers with a capital P.” The Academy’s use of an advisory committee of architects prompts Wright to remark that “an architect is either an inspiration or…he’s merely a committee-mind…a liability.”

Asked whether he’s acquainted with New York’s planned Lincoln Center complex, Wright remarks, “I think it wouldn’t do me any good to become acquainted with it. I suggest the other way around: they become…acquainted with the ones that I’m doing.”

Two notable influences on the young Wright were his itinerant childhood (his father was a traveling minister), and years spent on his uncle’s Wisconsin farm where he “learned…the region in every line and feature…the modeling of the hills, the weaving and fabric that clings to them, the look of it all in tender green or covered with snow or in full glow of summer.” His mother, a school teacher, enhanced his understanding of structure by giving him a set of newly invented blocks developed by revolutionary German educator Friedrich Fröbel whose theories laid the foundations for modern education.

Beyond architecture, Wright is also noted as a singularly influential and innovative urban planner, interior designer, architectural writer, and educator. He is noted for his often prescient, sometimes embattled philosophical and social views, a range well displayed in this broadcast, when in the middle of describing his new designs for homes with children’s playrooms, he can’t help but point out that “the American family should be three, not four…and above that, heavily taxed, more and more as they increase in number.” (Wright fathered seven children.)..

Recognized by the American Institute of Architects as “the greatest American architect of all time,” Frank Lloyd Wright was born in Richland Center, Wis., and went on to design 1,141 structures — including houses, offices, churches, clinics, schools, libraries, bridges, and museums — 532 of which were built. Today, 409 are still standing, nearly one-third of them listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Wright died in 1959, six months before the Guggenheim opened.

Asked what architects could do to help build “a better society and civilization,” Wright slips into an uncharacteristically heartfelt tone, suggesting they “study nature, seriously, intelligently, and with feeling, and appreciation.” He also warns that if New York City doesn’t acquire more green space immediately, it will be “uninhabitable.”

At least four of Wright’s descendants became architects, one of whom, his son John Lloyd Wright, invented Lincoln Logs. Other descendants include an architecture professor, two interior designers, a master woodworker, and the actress Anne Baxter, who is Wright’s granddaughter..”  Fascinating…

image: © 2009 The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA; article: Charis Conn, WNYC, NEH

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* Architecture: Sou Fujimoto designs Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 17 February 2013

Sou Fujimoto designs Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013

Architecture:  Sou Fujimoto designs Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013: “..Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto has been named as the designer of this year’s Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, which will be a cloud-like structure made from a lattice of steel poles..The semi-transparent pavilion will occupy 350 square-metres of lawn outside the London gallery. Two entrances will lead inside the structure, where staggered terraces will provide seating for a central cafe..Sou Fujimoto describes his design as “an architectural landscape” where “the vivid greenery of the surrounding plant life [is] woven together with a constructed geometry”..”The delicate quality of the structure, enhanced by its semi-transparency, will create a geometric, cloud-like form, as if it were mist rising from the undulations of the park,” said Fujimoto. “From certain vantage points, the pavilion will appear to merge with the classical structure of the Serpentine Gallery, with visitors suspended in space.” The temporary pavilion will open to the public on 8 June and will remain in Kensington Gardens until 20 October..Sou Fujimoto is the third Japanese architect to accept the annual unpaid commission, which is one of the most highly sought-after small projects in world architecture and goes to a major architect who hasn’t yet built in the UK. Toyo Ito designed the pavilion in 2002, while SANAA followed in 2009..Last year’s pavilion was a cork-lined archaeological dig created by Herzog & de Meuron with Ai Weiwei, who was forbidden to leave China at the time..”

See our posts on past Serpentine Pavilions:

image + article: Dezeen

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Art, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Cultural Architecture, Design, Designalog, Galleries, Hospitality Architecture, Public Architecture, Public Facilities, Public Parks | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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