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Archive for the ‘Design & Decoration’ Category

* Residential Architecture: The Glass House by AR Design Studio

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 18 May 2013

The Glass House by AR Design Studio

Residential Architecture: The Glass House by AR Design Studio: “..AR Design Studio have completed a glass extension on a house in Winchester, England, UK..it is not every day that a body is found buried on your building site, but on a summer’s morning in 2012 this is exactly what happened while builders were laying foundations for RIBA award-winning architects AR Design Studio’s latest project. By 6pm they had found another 2..After the initial astonishment, the Police and later a team of Archaeologists were brought in who thankfully identified the remains as being of Roman origin. After a period of intense excavation, it was confirmed as a site of Archaeological importance when further evidence of Roman burials and defensive fortifications were uncovered, including the discovery of a rare Roman burial urn. Once the site was cleared of artefacts and the bodies taken to the local museum for research, work on the building could continue..These ancient findings further added to the already rich historical context of the property situated in the town of Winchester, the old Roman capital of England. The project was to convert the original servants’ quarters of the large Manor House that overlooked the surrounding grasslands. It was built by the Earl of Airlie in 1856 while he served as Camp Commandant at the nearby Peninsular Barracks military base and split into two more modestly sized dwellings in the 1950s..Since then, the servants’ quarters had fallen into a state of disrepair after the unfortunate passing of a sole elderly owner. It remained vacant for a number of years, until the long-time occupants of the Manor House sought to retire and move into the more manageable servants’ quarters and turn it into their dream home..The owner’s love of glass fuelled their brief to construct a beautifully simple sculptural glass staircase and a contemporary glass extension, situated at the rear of the property in the space created by the ‘C’ shape of the building, which would open itself up to the garden..The couple approached AR Design Studio Chartered Architects because of their experience in dealing with glass architecture and their interest in how this material can be used to create seamless relationships between inside and outside space, between the man-made and nature..Hidden from view behind the buildings traditional façade, the finished extension is an elegant piece of modern contemporary glass architecture. It completely reinvents the feel and atmosphere of the previously dark and cramped servants’ quarters; all within the rich and poignant historical context of the site..The concept was to provide a clean and light architectural intervention alongside the traditional shell of the building which would positively affect the feel and functionality of the property. The spaces are designed to accentuate a play between light and dark; contrasting from the bright and open communal spaces to the more subtle and secluded, almost cave-like retreat spaces in the old house. The existing layout was clarified; vertical voids were cut through the house to unite the cellar, ground and first floors and redirect the flow of the house to naturally draw the user towards the new glass space at the heart of the home..This extremely light and spacious frameless glass extension houses the open-plan kitchen, living and dining areas. As the delicate structure reaches over to form the walls and roof of the extension, it creates a flexible inside/outside space allowing sunlight to flood through the home and filter down gradually, creating beautiful shards of light and shadow..As a contrast to the extension, the formal lounge, study and dining room have a more sheltered and embracing nature. Upstairs, the Glass House has 4 large double bedrooms, each with an en-suite bathroom. The master suite has its own walk-in wardrobe and views overlooking the garden and the top of the glass extension below. All the essentials have been accounted for, in the form of utility and laundry rooms, study and WC that flank the glass box..The strategic placement of the large roof light floods the entrance hall with sunlight that tracks through the double-height space with the time of day and the seasons. Timber ceramic tiling was used as an innovative alternative to traditional timber flooring because it does not discolour in the weather and is a perfect surface to compliment the underfloor heating throughout. This allowed for a seamless floor finish running from the inside to the outside onto the cantilevered patio..The rest of the house is finished to a minimal and clean appearance to allow the functional glass structures to stand out as exquisite pieces of sculptural art in their own right..Whilst still retaining a subtle street appearance, the finished property now renamed Clarkes, is completely transformed from its previous gloomy and decrepit nature. The modern renovation and extension creates a light, airy and open living environment bursting with traditional values, contemporary style and innovative design..”  Extensive glazing, naturally enough, and abundant natural light, garden views; interesting renovation and addition to an existing structure..

See our posts on three other homes by AR Design Studio:

image: Martin Gardner; article: Contemporist

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* Residential Architecture: House in Monasterios by Ramon Esteve

Posted by the editors on Friday, 17 May 2013

House in Monasterios by Ramon Esteve

Residential Architecture: House in Monasterios by Ramon Esteve: “..The house is located in an elevated area, from which it dominates a hillside leading down to the sea. This view marks the direction the walls will take and, in an abstract form, define the project. The house is structured as a compaction of volumes of varying heights, and the form established by the main walls..The articulating space volume of this sequence is obtained from opening courts and patios in the central space of the house. A series of open courtyards are formed, covered in its perimeter like an atrium, in search of the access to the house, obtaining different perceptions of the house..The views from any point intersect and are never interrupted along the permeable sequence at the end of which, limited between glass membranes, is the lobby. Thus, it creates an approach path that exposes the more intimate side of the house so that, once inside, you discover the long views over the hillside to the sea..Among the great defining walls, the space is closed with large glass panels protected with wooden movable planes, graduating the closing level of each piece..The housing program is focused very clearly in the direction marked by the walls, and volumes depend on the spatial hierarchy of spaces. Two wooden emerging volumes, materialized by the chimneys, mark the counterpoint to the horizontality that defines the entire house..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, views; interesting fenestration, interior details and materiality..

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image: © Mayte Piera; article: “House in Monasterios / Ramon Esteve” 09 May 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Tower House by Gluck+

Posted by the editors on Thursday, 16 May 2013

Tower House by Gluck+

Residential Architecture:  Tower House by Gluck+: “..This holiday home in upstate New York, USA, by US firm Gluck+ features an elevated living room that hovers nine metres above the ground..As the weekend retreat for Thomas Gluck – one of the firm’s principals – and his family, Tower House was designed as a four-storey tower with a “treetop aerie”, affording mountain views across the nearby Catskill Park..The house is glazed on every side. In some places Gluck+ has fitted dark green panels behind to camouflage the walls with the surrounding woodland, while other areas remain transparent, revealing a bright yellow staircase that zigzags up behind the southern elevation..Taut vertical cables form the balustrade for this staircase and are interspersed with small lights, intended to look like fireflies after dark..One of the main aims of the design was to minimise the impact on the landscape. The architects achieved this by lifting the large living areas off the ground and stacking bedrooms and bathrooms on the three floors beneath, creating a base footprint of just 40 square metres..This arrangement also allows all of the wet rooms to be arranged in an insulated central core. When the house isn’t is use, this core isolates the heating systems, helping to reduce energy consumption..The three bedrooms are positioned on the north side of the house, where they can benefit from the most consistent daylight, and contain yellow furniture to match the colour of the staircase..The living room above is divided up into four different zones by the arrangement of furniture and features a 12-metre-long window seat that spans the entire space. There’s also a secluded roof terrace on the next level up..New York-based Gluck+ was known until recently as Peter Gluck and Partners. The firm is now run by Peter, his son Thomas, and three other principals..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, views; interesting cantilevered form, fenestration, furnishings.. Interesting photos and slideshow..

See our posts on two other home by Gluck+:

image: © Paul Warchol; article: Dezeen

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* Residential Architecture: Kerry House by Carson and Crushell Architects

Posted by the editors on Thursday, 16 May 2013

Kerry House by Carson and Crushell Architects

Residential Architecture: Kerry House by Carson and Crushell Architects: “..This project is a major reworking of a dilapidated 1960′s bungalow overlooking Kenmare River, Kenmare, Ireland. The structure was wrapped in a thick insulated render lining with high performance glazing fitted flush into existing and newly made openings. All internal rooms were reorganised, improving relationships between the bedrooms and their new en-suites and the relocated kitchen, dining room and central courtyard. In addition, a terrace and long bench of Kilkenny limestone were made to extend the living spaces into the landscape..”  Extensive glazing, natural light; interesting contemporary renovation and reworking of an existing structure..

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image: Courtesy of Carson and Crushell Architects; article: “Kerry House / Carson and Crushell Architects” 12 May 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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