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Archive for the ‘General’ Category

‘Keyed to Detail, No Matter How Crazy’, by Alice Rawsthorn – The Sensual Intelligence of Designer Aldo Bakker

Posted by the editors on Monday, 14 November 2011

Alice Rawsthorn, the keen-eyed observer of all things design, has written a very interesting article entitled “Keyed to Detail, No Matter How Crazy” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times, looking at the wide variety of designs created by Dutch designer Aldo Bakker, son of Droog Design group co-founder Gijs Bakker and jewelry designer Emmy van Leersum.  With an extraordinarily sharp eye, a sensual sense of detail, and a painstaking rigor in fabrication, Aldo Bakker’s creations are well-worth the detour.  Based in Amsterdam, a selection of Bakker’s work will be shown at the gallery Perimeter  in Paris, 18 November 2011 through 15 January 2012. View other posts on articles written by Alice Rawsthorn: Graphic Design: With a Big Boost From Technology, by Alice Rawsthorn‘Postmodern, but Not Especially Proud of It’ by Alice RawsthornCan Anybody Be a Designer? by Alice RawsthornVisually Stunning, Technologically Ingenious, Poetic, Subversive – The Lighting of Ron Gilad for FLOS by Alice RawsthornA Taxonomy of Office Chairs – You’ll Never Look at Them the Same Way Again

image: Erik and Petra Hesmerg/The New York Times

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Posted in contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Exhibitions, Furniture, General, Glassware, Interiors, Product Design, Tableware | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Can Anybody Be a Designer? by Alice Rawsthorn

Posted by the editors on Monday, 3 October 2011

Alice Rawsthorn, always a very sharp observer of all things design (and more), has written a lively and very interesting article entitled “Can Anybody Be a Designer?” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times looking at the increasingly open use of the words “design” and “designer”, and wondering, as many of use do with, perhaps, less perspicacity, “The thinking behind “open design” sounds sensible, as well as being generous and inclusive, but what are its implications? Is there anything to be gained by redefining things that have long been described, seemingly successfully, as scientific, political, technological or just plain resourceful as design? And could anything be lost by doing so?”

Any thoughts on the matter?

image: Gwangju Design BiennaleA DNA barcode Gorilla visualization in The International Barcode of Life Project, featured in “Unnamed.”

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture & Design in China, Articles, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Exhibitions, General, Graphic Design, Green Design, Humanitarian Design, Museums, Product Design, Urban Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Not-So-Smart-Cities – A Robot City in New Mexico, USA

Posted by the editors on Monday, 26 September 2011

Greg Lindsay, visiting scholar at the Rudin Center for Transportation Policy and Management at New York University and the co-author of “Aerotropolis: The Way We’ll Live Next” has written a very interesting article entitled “Not-So-Smart Cities” in The Opinion Pages of the Sunday Review of The New York Times, looking at “smart-city” urban design simulation, its limitations, and the upcoming creation of a robot city in New Mexico (USA) for the express purpose of “fine-tuning” urban design data simulation.  Aside from the interest that the possibly retro-techno-futuristic aspects of a “robot city” may hold, the limitations are significant.  Lindsay cites, among others, the example of Jane Jacobs, who, taking on the myth that was Robert Moses, says, “cities are immune to precisely this kind of objective, computation-driven analysis. Much like the weather, Ms. Jacobs said, cities are astoundingly complex systems, governed by feedback loops that are broadly understood yet impossible to replicate.” and others, notably those with a stake in the “robot city” project, who say, ” armed with enough data and computing muscle, we can translate cities’ complexity into algorithms. Sensors automatically do the measuring for us, while software makes the complexity manageable…’We think that sensor development has gotten to the point now where you can replicate human behavior,’ said Robert H. Brumley, the managing director and co-founder of Pegasus. These days, he and others believe, even the unpredictable “human factor” is, given enough computing power, predictable. ‘You can build randomness in.'”

“[P]laying SimCity for real”?…

image: Paul Hoppe/The New York Times

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Posted in Articles, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, General, Links, Urban Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Architecture: Zaha Hadid: Chinese Gem That Elevates Its Setting by Nicolai Ouroussoff

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 6 July 2011

Guangzhou Opera House by Zaha Hadid, photo by Iwan Baan

The outstanding architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussoff has written an inspired and inspiring article entitled “Chinese Gem That Elevates Its Setting” in the Art & Design section of The New York Times looking at the marvel that is Zaha Hadid‘s Guangzhou Opera House.  Ouroussoff’s fine eye, and gift for language, make his article a model for astute, yet accessible, architectural observation and critique.

Knowing that Ouroussoff will soon be leaving his post as primary architecture critic at The New York Times, to be replaced by art critic Michael Kimmelman, certainly saddens us here at Designalog, who have always appreciated, though not always agreed with, his keen observations (though we have always thought his writing was marvelous).  We hope that he will continue to offer us, in the future, the fruits of his many talents.

Any information on Ouroussoff’s next endeavors?  Any ideas about an art critic taking on the role of the primary architecture critic for such a widely read publication?  Do let us know.

Excellent slide show, with photos by Iwan Baan, accompanying Ouroussoff’s article, here.

Guangzhou Opera House by Zaha Hadid, interior view; photo by Iwan Baan

images: Iwan Baan/The New York Times

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture & Design in China, Articles, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, General, Interiors, lighting, Links, Photography, Slide Shows | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments »

 
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