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Archive for the ‘Infrastructure Architecture’ Category

* Architecture: Park 1 Stockholm by White Arkitektur

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 9 March 2013

Park 1 Stockholm by White Arkitektur

Architecture: Park 1 Stockholm by White Arkitektur: “..white arkitectur’s ‘park 1′ is a new typology for a civic structure, one that contributes to the greenery of the urban environment while dutifully performing the functions of an infrastructural complex. designed to house a traffic and emergency management center in addition to a fire station, the building serves kungsholmen, an island district of a historical province in stockholm city, Sweden. in a bid won with associates at AG arkitekter, the pragmatic program of 1200 new workplaces is bolstered by the dynamic inclusion of a restaurant, cafe, conference facilities and exhibition areas, all open to the public. the active spaces are arranged in five layers, with the fire station at the bottom level and the civic services center and office at the top, sandwiching the public floors. the architecture inclines back from the busy street of lindhagensgatan and cantilevers over the essingeleden highway– a poetic gesture that expresses a self-conscious sense of aestheticism. the building transcends purely functional geometry with a generous green roof, affording views from an impressive 50 meter height and acting as a foliage-filled oasis of rest and recreation. the structure complies with the eco-certification BREEAM and sweden’s own sustainability policy miljöbyggnad; the public rooftop park acting as a particular contributor to the biodiversity of the site and significant producer of solar energy. developed with london-based engineers at AKT, a double-skinned facade is informed by the intricate shapes of a circuit board, itself characterized by myriad nodes and synapses individually simple but infinitely combinable. the conceptual pattern describes the coordination center’s round-the-clock functions and connects the building activities of coordination, management and infrastructure with the architectonics of the exterior..”

image: © white arkitektur; article: Designboom

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Posted in Designalog, green, Architecture, Design, contemporary design, Solar Design, Green Design, Contemporary Architecture, Architects, Public Parks, Sustainable Architecture, Infrastructure Architecture, Institutional Architecture, Sustainable Design, Mixed-Use Architecture, Public Facilities, Architecture + Design, Public Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Architecture: Domino Sugar in Brooklyn by SHoP Architects and James Corner Field Operations

Posted by the editors on Friday, 8 March 2013

Domino Sugar in Brooklyn by SHoP Architects and James Corner Field Operations

Architecture:  Domino Sugar in Brooklyn by SHoP Architects and James Corner Field Operations: “..Manhattan studio SHoP Architects has designed a masterplan of hollow skyscrapers surrounded by gardens for the site of the former Domino Sugar refinery in Brooklyn, New York, USA..Working alongside landscape architects James Corner Field Operations, SHoP Architects has planned a mixed-use complex that includes the renovation of the nineteenth century factory, five new buildings, plus a series of public parks, gardens and sports fields..The plans replace earlier proposals by Rafael Viñoly for the historic site, which started production as a sugar factory in 1856 but has been out of use since 2004. Viñoly’s proposals proved unpopular with local residents, so developer Two Trees commissioned an alternative that would offer taller buildings but more public spaces..”If you’re standing next to a 400-foot tall building or a 600-foot tall building, you have no idea,” SHoP principal Vishaan Chakrabarti told New York magazine Curbed. “But if a 600-foot building means that you get a park where your kid can graduate, that means something to you.”..The tallest building in the scheme is a 180-metre tower, which will be positioned beside the Williamsburg Bridge to the south. Other structures will be shorter in height, relating to the scale of buildings to the north and east, and will include a tower with a rectangular void through its middle and a school at its base, plus a 600-unit apartment building. The old factory will be transformed into offices for technology companies and the creative industries..The developer plans to push ahead with the project this year and is organising community meetings in the upcoming weeks..SHoP Architects has worked on a number of high-profile projects recently. The team completed the Barclays sports arena in Brooklyn in September and is also developing a masterplan for a new “silicon” city in Kenya..New York-based James Corner Field Operations is best known for its role on the High Line, an elevated park on an abandoned railway..”

See some of our other posts on work by James Corner Field Operations:

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Educational Architecture, Infrastructure Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Public Architecture, Public Facilities, Public Parks, Residential Architecture, Urban Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Architecture: ‘The Artistic and the Beautiful’: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Wide-Ranging Views (audio interview)

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 3 March 2013

The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

Architecture: ‘The Artistic and the Beautiful’: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Wide-Ranging Views (audio interview): “..In 1957, two years before his death, Frank Lloyd Wright sat down with WNYC (ndlr: radio) to discuss his design philosophy, exhibiting his trademark eloquence and blistering opinions. The year of this interview marks an explosion of commissions for Wright, who by then had been practicing architecture for 70 years..

Wright mainly designed homes until 1957-58, when he took on 90 new projects, many for public buildings. Over all, Wright’s last decade was his most prolific, accounting for nearly one-third of his oeuvre. This interview was recorded in his Plaza Hotel apartment where he’d moved two years earlier in order to oversee construction of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, on which he had been working for 14 years. Here, Wright neatly dismisses the project’s many critics, promising “…a new point of view…it’s going to be so enlivening and refreshing that it will make some of these painters quite ashamed of the protest that they issued against it.”

In this interview, Wright also expresses distaste for the nascent designs of Sydney Opera House, as well as the U.S. Air Force Academy structure, whose designers he lambasts as “Poetry Crushers with a capital P.” The Academy’s use of an advisory committee of architects prompts Wright to remark that “an architect is either an inspiration or…he’s merely a committee-mind…a liability.”

Asked whether he’s acquainted with New York’s planned Lincoln Center complex, Wright remarks, “I think it wouldn’t do me any good to become acquainted with it. I suggest the other way around: they become…acquainted with the ones that I’m doing.”

Two notable influences on the young Wright were his itinerant childhood (his father was a traveling minister), and years spent on his uncle’s Wisconsin farm where he “learned…the region in every line and feature…the modeling of the hills, the weaving and fabric that clings to them, the look of it all in tender green or covered with snow or in full glow of summer.” His mother, a school teacher, enhanced his understanding of structure by giving him a set of newly invented blocks developed by revolutionary German educator Friedrich Fröbel whose theories laid the foundations for modern education.

Beyond architecture, Wright is also noted as a singularly influential and innovative urban planner, interior designer, architectural writer, and educator. He is noted for his often prescient, sometimes embattled philosophical and social views, a range well displayed in this broadcast, when in the middle of describing his new designs for homes with children’s playrooms, he can’t help but point out that “the American family should be three, not four…and above that, heavily taxed, more and more as they increase in number.” (Wright fathered seven children.)..

Recognized by the American Institute of Architects as “the greatest American architect of all time,” Frank Lloyd Wright was born in Richland Center, Wis., and went on to design 1,141 structures — including houses, offices, churches, clinics, schools, libraries, bridges, and museums — 532 of which were built. Today, 409 are still standing, nearly one-third of them listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Wright died in 1959, six months before the Guggenheim opened.

Asked what architects could do to help build “a better society and civilization,” Wright slips into an uncharacteristically heartfelt tone, suggesting they “study nature, seriously, intelligently, and with feeling, and appreciation.” He also warns that if New York City doesn’t acquire more green space immediately, it will be “uninhabitable.”

At least four of Wright’s descendants became architects, one of whom, his son John Lloyd Wright, invented Lincoln Logs. Other descendants include an architecture professor, two interior designers, a master woodworker, and the actress Anne Baxter, who is Wright’s granddaughter..”  Fascinating…

image: © 2009 The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA; article: Charis Conn, WNYC, NEH

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Art, Articles, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Cultural Architecture, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Educational Architecture, Exhibitions, Galleries, green, Green Design, Humanitarian Design, Infrastructure Architecture, Institutional Architecture, Interiors, Interviews, Mid-Century Design, Modernism, Museums, Public Architecture, Public Facilities, Public Parks, Residential Architecture, Urban Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Architecture: HASSELL, OMA, and Populous To Redevelop Sydney Harbour

Posted by the editors on Thursday, 13 December 2012

HASSELL, OMA, and Populous To Redevelop Sydney Harbour

Architecture: HASSELL, OMA, and Populous To Redevelop Sydney Harbour: “..Australian firm HASSELL Studio, OMA and Populous have been announced as the winners for the redevelopment of Sydney’s new convention, exhibition and entertainment precinct (SICEEP) at Darling Harbour..The 20-hectare, billion dollar project, which will stretch from Cockle Bay to Haymarket and Ultimo, will include Australia’s largest convention and exhibition facilities, Sydney’s largest red carpet entertainment venue,  a hotel complex with up to 900 rooms, and a new urban neighborhood in Haymarket..The new facilities – with the working title of Darling Harbour Live – will include: The International Convention Centre Sydney (ICC Sydney) (with flexible convention spaces that can house from 750 to 2,5000 people as well as a ballroom with 2,000 person capacity); The ICC Exhibition Centre (over 35,000 sqm of exhibition space, another 5,000 sqm of internal flexible space, a 5,000 sqm event deck with city views, and a terraced landscape to conceal the loading dock and expand public open space); A red carpet entertainment venue (whose fan-shaped layout will reduce the building footprint and expand open space; it will also have a capacity for 8,000 people); and a hotel complexwith up to 900 rooms..Moreover, the plan includes an additional hectare of open space, including an expanded/renovated Tumbalong Park (which will be re-integrated into Darling Harbour with new connections), a new Boulevard (which will act as the central North-South pedestrian route), and three new public gathering spaces integrated into the city: Harbourside Place, Chinese Garden Square, and Haymarket Square..According to Australian MP Barry O’Farrell, “The redevelopment goes far beyond improving facilities – it’s also about re-shaping the city. Darling Harbour already attracts 25 million people a year and this development will create a more vibrant place on Sydney Harbour.”..Destination Sydney, the consortium of developers who will develop the project, echo the sentiment: “This project will redefine Sydney as a global city and create one of the world’s great meeting and entertainment destinations. Not only will it become a beacon for international visitors for conventions and events but will also build on the appeal of the Darling Harbour area for Sydneysiders creating an entertainment hub that promises to reconnect and re-energise the city.”..Construction will commence on The Haymarket in 2014; the new facilities and public spaces are expected to open in December 2016..(Story via Australian Design Review and SICEEP)..

See another of our posts on OMA: Architecture: Reinier de Graaf of OMA presents “architecture with a social conscience”.

See another of our posts on Populous: Architecture: Olympic Stadium for London 2012 Olympics by Populous.

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image: © SICEEP; article: Quirk , Vanessa. “HASSELL, OMA, and Populous To Redevelop Sydney Harbour” 11 Dec 2012. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/305713&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Hospitality Architecture, Infrastructure Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Mixed-Use Architecture, Public Parks | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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