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Archive for the ‘lighting’ Category

* Residential Architecture: Fairhaven Residence by John Wardle Architects

Posted by the editors on Monday, 13 May 2013

Fairhaven Residence by John Wardle Architects

Residential Architecture: Fairhaven Residence by John Wardle Architects: “..The Fairhaven Beach House is located on top of the ridgeline above the Great Ocean Road on the Victorian coastline (Victoria, Australia). The site enjoys panoramic views over the southern ocean and surf beach below. The house winds around a protected central courtyard, which creates an outdoor space sheltered from the harsh prevailing winds. The form of the house is coiled and stepped around the courtyard. The living area doors and an oversized sliding kitchen window open up and integrate it with the house proper during fine weather..The spatial journey through the house from arrival to view is choreographed to increase anticipation before reaching the main living space. As you step beneath a cantilevered study into a dramatic vertical entry space, you become acutely aware of a number of twists and folds along its length that make the transformation into horizontal living space. The main window aperture matches the cinematic proportions of the ocean view..Materially the house is clad in a green-grey zinc cladding, for both its longevity and natural colouring that merges with the scrub and tea tree landscape. In contrast, the interior of the house is completely lined in timber (floors, walls, cabinetry and ceilings) to form an enclosure for living that its inhabitants become completely immersed within. The eye is then always drawn back to the outlook beyond..The proportions, orientation and dimensions of windows have been tailored to particular views and to reveal internal spaces. The design process has been one akin to scenography, bringing together sensory and spatial experiences to frame the theatre of inhabitation within..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, wonderful ocean views; interesting form, materiality, interior volumes and details..

See our posts on two other homes by John Wardle Architects:

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image: © Trevor Mein; article: “Fairhaven Residence / John Wardle Architects” 07 May 2013. ArchDaily

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Furniture, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, lighting, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Queenscliff Residence by John Wardle Architects

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 12 May 2013

Queenscliff Residence by John Wardle Architects

Residential Architecture: Queenscliff Residence by John Wardle Architects: “..This house acts as an optical instrument, a series of devices that frame views beyond the abutting foreshore to the south toward the Heads of Port Phillip Bay (Queenscliff, Victoria, Australia).  The most significant promenade through the site, and house itself, takes you from the street along a gently stepped path to the entry stair which then elevates you sufficiently to appreciate the view as you arrive at the uppermost level.  The careful choreography of this sequence is amplified by materiality and adjacencies.  Fine timber detailing alongside the path, woven wicker within the stair and Calacatta marble in the kitchen.  The experience on entry is private and cocooned from the exterior.  Once above, the views expand and are focussed on the horizon of the ocean to the south..A challenge for Victorian coastal houses is to reconcile the southern views with northern solar orientation. In this instance, a courtyard has been introduced to gain northern aspect to the living spaces and to capture the afternoon sun within an environment shielded from the strong southerlies. The principal bedroom is oriented south stealing ocean views through the main living pavilion and across the courtyard..The house is carefully zoned to allow for privacy between parents and adult children on a narrow site. The main living and dining space is where family and friends come together. In this way, the house is designed for a busy family life, allowing for both privacy and communal gathering.. The direct visual connection between the interior and the sea encourages the contemplation of ships crossing the Heads en route to distant ports, a relaxing retreat from work..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, astounding sea views; interesting form, timber cladding and screening, interior volumes, materiality, contextuality..

See our post on another home by John Wardle Architects: Residential Architecture: Shearers’ Quarters House by John Wardle Architects

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image: © Trevor Mein; article: “Queenscliff Residence / John Wardle Architects” 07 May 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Furniture, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, lighting, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Smith-Clementi Residence by Rios Clementi Hale Studios

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 5 May 2013

Smith-Clementi Residence by Rios Clementi Hale Studios

Residential Architecture: Smith-Clementi Residence by Rios Clementi Hale Studios: “..ProgramExterior and interior remodel and addition to single-family home and adjacent yard. First floor: living area, kitchen/breakfast room, powder room, outdoor dining, garage. Second floor: master suite, family room/office, two children’s bedrooms, children’s bath, utility room. Design: Originally built in 1920s (at 600 square feet) and renovated by husband-and-wife architects in 1996 with second-floor addition, the house grew again in 2012 with the addition of a second lot, reconfiguration of public and private areas, and new garage and master suite. The resulting home now revolves around indoor/outdoor connections to the vast patio space with decorative and working gardens. The front volume maintains a refined lap siding as a signal to the house’s bungalow origins with a scale appropriate for the walk street, while the expressive back volume sports exaggerated vertical wood framing as sunshades to the glass master bedroom volume. “A house and its antithesis,” is how the architects/homeowners describe the relationship between the two elements. The house slowly reveals itself along a walk street in Venice, California, with the design juxtapositions foreshadowed by corresponding fences—a vine-covered traditional wrought-iron fence leads into an raw- wood rustic picket fence. The idea of “Cape Cod meets California Modern” is displayed in the varying rooflines that open the structure to natural light and create terraces for outdoor living. Public areas on the ground floor flow into each other and toward the outdoors. A new large sliding-glass door opens the lower level out to the generous plaza formed from linear concrete slabs with grass and pebbles interspersed. No-mow grass surrounds the front elevated entry porch, which begins the consistent black concrete-tile flooring that travels from outside through the first-floor living, dining, and kitchen areas, then back outside to the al fresco dining platform. Muted colors on the exterior are derived from the landscape and majestic magnolia tree on the property, while natural-wood trim further connects the structure to the landscape. Accessible openings—doors and operable windows—are trimmed in olive paint. The back volume addition encompasses garage and storage with glass-enclosed master suite above. Structural, vertical raw-wood framing is expressively placed around the glass volume. In additional to functionally acting as sunscreens, the beams connote a tree house and correspond to the picket fence in both materiality and attitude. Both front and back parts of the house are distinct on the ground floor—connected by the open-air dining terrace—while the upper- level, cement-board cladded “bridge” connection is more seamless from the interior, acting as a large, common space shared by the family. Immediately upon entering the home, one feels the senses of light and play. Window walls face the outdoor areas and clerestory windows express the changing levels. Standing in the entry living room, one can see clear through to the breakfast area, outdoor dining, and garage. The living room features built-in and free-standing custom benches upholstered in lively patterned fabric. The existing fireplace was re-clad in origami-like dark metal. Materials were chosen to express functionality, thus natural wood and plywood are used extensively, allowing family art and artifacts to add color and character. The open kitchen features a built-in banquette and breakfast table, sleek and simple white cabinetry, and plywood- covered exhaust hood above the working antique stove, which once belonged to noted architect Ming Fung’s mother (Smith and Clementi met at Hodgetts + Fung early in their careers). The custom butcher- block island unfolds to a playful Buffalo profile. Floor-to-ceiling plywood book and entertainment center leads to the heavy timber wood staircase. Upstairs, two bedrooms and a shared bath for the owners’ nine- and 16-year-old daughters are separated from the master suite by the “bridge”. Central to the bridge is the open family room—a hub of activity combining TV viewing, computer, and various other functions that mirror the family’s lifestyle. The flooring changes from wood to cork tiles beyond an olive-colored floor-to-ceiling door that opens to the master suite, which includes seating area, terrace, bath, and walk-in closets. A seven-foot-high plywood wall acts as headboard and privacy shield to the alley, while the CMU wall extends up from the garage below and then through the full-height glass wall to the outdoor balcony. Sliding and pocketing doors on two sides can be opened and closed as desired to manage degrees of openness. The hanging fireplace swivels to direct heat either toward the room or toward the balcony. The plywood storage wall is inset with red doorways leading into closets and the master bath. Open shelves allow a clear view into the bath, which may alternately by closed off by sliding the door all the way across. White cabinetry and positive/negative faux bois tile highlight the master bath. Obtaining the neighboring lot gave the owners the freedom to open the home up to the outside. “Even though we’re Modernists,” notes Frank, “the relationship to the outdoors in the previous renovation wasn’t sufficient.” Orienting views toward the existing 80-year-old Magnolia Grande Flora tree resulted in short vistas with long diagonals that afford views, light, and air. On the adjoining property sits an olive-colored house for Julie’s mother, who also collaborated on the landscape. Long troughs with growing vegetable are placed along the walk street..” Interesting cladding / timber sun-screen, interior volumes and details; indoor / outdoor sensibility..

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image: © Undine Pröhl; article: “Smith-Clementi Residence / Rios Clementi Hale Studios” 01 May 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, lighting, Modernism, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Manor House Stables by AR Design Studio

Posted by the editors on Thursday, 25 April 2013

Manor House Stables by AR Design Studio

Residential Architecture: Manor House Stables by AR Design Studio: “..Friday April 5th 1946, on a beautifully clear Spring afternoon crowds cheered as the 25/1 racehorse, “Lovely Cottage”, strode triumphantly past the finishing post to be crowned winner of the Grand National, the UKs largest horse race. Trained by Tommy Rayson and ridden by Captain Robert Petre at the first true Aintree Grand National race since 1940, after the Second World War, and the last to take place on a Friday, which had been the tradition since 1876..That weekend “Lovely Cottage” returned home to the small village of Headbourne Worthy, Winchester, UK. He received a hero’s welcome before settling in for a well-earned rest in the stables at the Manor House where he was housed.   These stables, that were once beautiful and functioning have since remained unused and have fallen into a state of dilapidation. Fortunately, this Grade 2 listed stable block, steeped in poignant historical character and narrative was not forgotten. It has been transformed into an elegant and contemporary 3 bedroom family home by RIBA award winning architects ..Practice Director, Andy Ramus, discovered this piece of overlooked historical heritage while undertaking a large scale refurbishment at the Manor House and immediately recognised its potential. The team at AR could see past its existing rundown state. There was a clear potential to create a sophisticated, contemporary family home within the historical context of the building and the picturesque Hampshire countryside..The history and character of the Stable’s was very much a driving force in design and there is a firm belief at AR Design Studio that design constraints and restrictions can often create the most interesting solutions. The concept was to preserve the existing while making any new additions simple and pure in order to let the original character shine. This results in an innovative arrangement of spaces according to the Stable’s existing layout, in order to maintain many of the existing exposed timber interior walls. These were then cleaned, stripped back and refurbished to reveal an exquisite amount of detailing and craftsmanship..With the existing internal walls brought back to life, the next task was to turn the Stables into a home for the modern family and bring it into the present day. In order to respect the character of the property a clean, contemporary and neutral approach was taken to the rest of the renovation which juxtaposes perfectly with the original timber walls, allowing them to stand out as pieces of art against a beautifully simple contemporary backdrop. Many of the existing features were refurbished and re-purposed for use in the home environment; the original horse troughs were cleaned and converted for use as sink basins, the old horse ties act as towel rings in the bathrooms and original doors are preserved where possible to give a sense of real period character..The Stables benefits from 3 large double bedrooms, with 2 en suite rooms to accompany a spacious family bathroom. Being a single storey property with long continuous views, the layout was tailored and split between sleeping and living accommodation with a single constant circulation running through the entire building. The welcoming and spacious open-plan kitchen dining area is conveniently located at the heart of the home, leading into the light and roomy lounge which benefits from full height glazed doors that open out onto the sleepy village setting..The entire property is super insulated, and the heated polished concrete floor throughout provides a functional uniformity to the spaces as well as recounting the Stable’s agricultural history. New windows and roof lights fitted throughout give the whole place a warm, bright and clean feel; creating an excellent environment as a backdrop for a family home..The finished Stables is completely transformed from its existing dilapidated condition and is now a perfectly working family home, bursting with contemporary style juxtaposed against delightful period character..”  Lovely contemporary transformation; extensive glazing, natural light; contextual and historical sensibility; interesting interior volumes; exquisite details..

See our other posts on homes by AR Design Studio:

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image: © Martin Gardner; article: “Manor House Stables / AR Design Studio” 17 Apr 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Cultural Architecture, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, lighting, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

 
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