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Posts Tagged ‘Additions’

* Residential Architecture: Smith-Clementi Residence by Rios Clementi Hale Studios

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 5 May 2013

Smith-Clementi Residence by Rios Clementi Hale Studios

Residential Architecture: Smith-Clementi Residence by Rios Clementi Hale Studios: “..ProgramExterior and interior remodel and addition to single-family home and adjacent yard. First floor: living area, kitchen/breakfast room, powder room, outdoor dining, garage. Second floor: master suite, family room/office, two children’s bedrooms, children’s bath, utility room. Design: Originally built in 1920s (at 600 square feet) and renovated by husband-and-wife architects in 1996 with second-floor addition, the house grew again in 2012 with the addition of a second lot, reconfiguration of public and private areas, and new garage and master suite. The resulting home now revolves around indoor/outdoor connections to the vast patio space with decorative and working gardens. The front volume maintains a refined lap siding as a signal to the house’s bungalow origins with a scale appropriate for the walk street, while the expressive back volume sports exaggerated vertical wood framing as sunshades to the glass master bedroom volume. “A house and its antithesis,” is how the architects/homeowners describe the relationship between the two elements. The house slowly reveals itself along a walk street in Venice, California, with the design juxtapositions foreshadowed by corresponding fences—a vine-covered traditional wrought-iron fence leads into an raw- wood rustic picket fence. The idea of “Cape Cod meets California Modern” is displayed in the varying rooflines that open the structure to natural light and create terraces for outdoor living. Public areas on the ground floor flow into each other and toward the outdoors. A new large sliding-glass door opens the lower level out to the generous plaza formed from linear concrete slabs with grass and pebbles interspersed. No-mow grass surrounds the front elevated entry porch, which begins the consistent black concrete-tile flooring that travels from outside through the first-floor living, dining, and kitchen areas, then back outside to the al fresco dining platform. Muted colors on the exterior are derived from the landscape and majestic magnolia tree on the property, while natural-wood trim further connects the structure to the landscape. Accessible openings—doors and operable windows—are trimmed in olive paint. The back volume addition encompasses garage and storage with glass-enclosed master suite above. Structural, vertical raw-wood framing is expressively placed around the glass volume. In additional to functionally acting as sunscreens, the beams connote a tree house and correspond to the picket fence in both materiality and attitude. Both front and back parts of the house are distinct on the ground floor—connected by the open-air dining terrace—while the upper- level, cement-board cladded “bridge” connection is more seamless from the interior, acting as a large, common space shared by the family. Immediately upon entering the home, one feels the senses of light and play. Window walls face the outdoor areas and clerestory windows express the changing levels. Standing in the entry living room, one can see clear through to the breakfast area, outdoor dining, and garage. The living room features built-in and free-standing custom benches upholstered in lively patterned fabric. The existing fireplace was re-clad in origami-like dark metal. Materials were chosen to express functionality, thus natural wood and plywood are used extensively, allowing family art and artifacts to add color and character. The open kitchen features a built-in banquette and breakfast table, sleek and simple white cabinetry, and plywood- covered exhaust hood above the working antique stove, which once belonged to noted architect Ming Fung’s mother (Smith and Clementi met at Hodgetts + Fung early in their careers). The custom butcher- block island unfolds to a playful Buffalo profile. Floor-to-ceiling plywood book and entertainment center leads to the heavy timber wood staircase. Upstairs, two bedrooms and a shared bath for the owners’ nine- and 16-year-old daughters are separated from the master suite by the “bridge”. Central to the bridge is the open family room—a hub of activity combining TV viewing, computer, and various other functions that mirror the family’s lifestyle. The flooring changes from wood to cork tiles beyond an olive-colored floor-to-ceiling door that opens to the master suite, which includes seating area, terrace, bath, and walk-in closets. A seven-foot-high plywood wall acts as headboard and privacy shield to the alley, while the CMU wall extends up from the garage below and then through the full-height glass wall to the outdoor balcony. Sliding and pocketing doors on two sides can be opened and closed as desired to manage degrees of openness. The hanging fireplace swivels to direct heat either toward the room or toward the balcony. The plywood storage wall is inset with red doorways leading into closets and the master bath. Open shelves allow a clear view into the bath, which may alternately by closed off by sliding the door all the way across. White cabinetry and positive/negative faux bois tile highlight the master bath. Obtaining the neighboring lot gave the owners the freedom to open the home up to the outside. “Even though we’re Modernists,” notes Frank, “the relationship to the outdoors in the previous renovation wasn’t sufficient.” Orienting views toward the existing 80-year-old Magnolia Grande Flora tree resulted in short vistas with long diagonals that afford views, light, and air. On the adjoining property sits an olive-colored house for Julie’s mother, who also collaborated on the landscape. Long troughs with growing vegetable are placed along the walk street..” Interesting cladding / timber sun-screen, interior volumes and details; indoor / outdoor sensibility..

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image: © Undine Pröhl; article: “Smith-Clementi Residence / Rios Clementi Hale Studios” 01 May 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, lighting, Modernism, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Berri Residence by NatureHumaine

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 24 April 2013

Berri Residence by NatureHumaine

Residential Architecture: Berri Residence by NatureHumaine: “..A couple with a passion for contemporary architecture wanted an extension to their 1940s duplex on Berri street in Montréal, Canada. Their main desire was to create a dining room that would become the heart of the house, where family discussions would take place..At the center of the new extension is the dining room just off the re-modeled kitchen on the ground floor. It has generous south-facing glazing and and a large dining table at its center. The master bedroom is located below the dining room overlooking the sunken garden. Despite the use of wood cladding, the extension has a sense of lightness and transparency due to the glass panels being pushed to their dimensional limits. The exterior finish is an olive green stained pine with an overhanging glazed volume clad in galvanized steel..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, garden views; interesting form and interior volumes..

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image: © Adrien Williams; article: “Berri Residence / NatureHumaine” 19 Apr 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Cabane 217 by Bourgeois Lechasseur Architectes

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 10 April 2013

Cabane 217 by Bourgeois Lechasseur Architectes

Residential Architecture: Cabane 217 by Bourgeois Lechasseur Architectes: “..Cabane 217 is a project to completely redesign a home located in Ste-Catherine-de-la-Jacques-Cartier, Quebec, Canada. The house is located on a wooded lot bordering the river. The owner wanted to give his home new life by opening it up to its surroundings. The changes also involved completely rethinking the living areas in order to create a dialogue between the outside and the inside. The basic premise consisted of preserving some of the building’s original country character and creating a contemporary project that is in harmony with its environment. The design followed a preliminary LEGO™ model created by the owner..The steep slope of the roof was kept, but the traditional dormer windows have been transformed. One dormer opens onto the street to shyly reveal the staircase and to provide light to the home’s central space. On the side nearest the river, part of the roof has been raised to accommodate the master bedroom and ensuite bathroom. This second, much larger, dormer creates an airy, bright space. The client was thus able to keep the idea of a “tree house” and still preserve privacy with the surrounding vegetation..The screen room that stands out from the main part of the building is an addition to the original house. This room has a fireplace and is both intimate and welcoming. This contrast with the spacious rooms and the large deck leads the client into a new relationship with his environment. It provides a threshold between the inside and the outside and frames the view of the site..The inside is now much brighter with nature all around. The kitchen has been completely renovated. The wood panels and the slate floor respect the natural, warm feel of the place. A new lighter, brighter staircase leads to the upper floor. The bathroom, with its spectacular shower, opens on the master bedroom. The floor-to-ceiling windows in the bedroom give the impression of floating in the trees..The materials used on the outside integrate well into the region’s natural and built environment. The original wood siding was kept and repainted. The windows are wood like the original ones and seem to flow into the marine plywood panels that extend and define the new elements. The metal roof reflects the sun and calls to mind the traditionally inspired design of this country home..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, nature views; impressive renovation, with extension, of traditional small home..

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image: © Stéphane Groleau; article: “Cabane 217 / Bourgeois Lechasseur Architectes” 05 Apr 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: House of Joyce & Jeroen by Personal Architecture

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 27 March 2013

House of Joyce & Jeroen by Personal Architecture

Residential Architecture: House of Joyce & Jeroen by Personal Architecture: “..The dilapidated state has necessitated a thorough reinforcement of the foundation and load-bearing structure of the entire house, opening up extraordinary possibilities in an otherwise commonplace apartment renovation..The combination of ambitious design visions and a large measure of trust from the client have resulted in a rigorous and uncompromising redesign, in which voids and split levels accentuate the full height of Den Haag, The Netherlands, typical row houses..The potential of the brick structure, the details such as glass-in-lead frames, and the characteristic “en-suite” room divisions were the deciding factors in purchasing the house, according to the clients. The tension between antique features and modern techniques is very evident in the redesign plan. The classical street façade is restored to its former glory, from ground to third floor..Behind the doors of the “en-suite“ element, a complete change is taking place. The rear façade is removed and clad with glass to a full height of 11 meters. The floor levels are detached from the façade, creating a void that spans three levels and generating an optimal source of daylight..In the back of the house, the load-bearing wall between the corridor and the living room  is replaced with a steel construction. Four new floors with a net height of 2,4 meters protrude from this construction. These floors remain openly linked to the existing floor levels. The interplay of voids, the split-levels and the glass façade, all create a spectacular drama between interior and exterior on the one hand, and between the existing and new floors on the other..The intervention in the back of the house can be interpreted as a three-dimensional, L-shaped element of five storeys, accessed by a new steel spiral staircase. The staircase brings a new dynamic between the different parts of the house and makes a separation between owners and guests possible. Vertically, the L-shaped element ends in a roof-terrace with jacuzzi and outer kitchen that lies far above the balconies of the lower floors..This rigorous redesign project has reorganized the total accessible surface of the house towards an excess of floor space, generating more rooms and more daylight. To the owner, the residence promises an extraordinary living experience. To passers-by, it cannot be distinguished from any other house on the van Merlenstraat..”  Outstanding redesign and renovation; extensive glazing, natural light; indoor / outdoor and contextual sensibility; interesting interior volumes, interplay and details..

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image: © René de Wit; article: “House of Joyce & Jeroen / Personal Architecture” 26 Mar 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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