Designalog

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Posts Tagged ‘Balconies’

* Residential Architecture: J4 Houses by Vertice Arquitectos

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 8 May 2013

J4 Houses by Vertice Arquitectos

Residential Architecture: J4 Houses by Vertice Arquitectos: “..We were faced with a plot of land shaped as a quarter of a circumference that had a height difference of 5.50 meters on the curved side. This side has a privileged view of the sea. In addition, we were conditioned by the construction regulations which enabled us to build two terraced levels..The project is based upon two containers, which have been cut, in order to adopt a “mineral” form. These different volumes have been designed to overhang in order to avoid the use of great contention walls and to create useful spaces beneath them. They also define the entrance to the house..The first volume, located at the highest point of the plot, hosts the main bedroom and has a one level. The second volume, located at the lowest height, has two floors, beneath of which the parking area situated..Access to the house is through a sloped garden that leads to the entrance hall, space which articulates both volumes. It takes us to the more intimate area of the entrance level and to the stairs. Through the stairs we reach, in first place, the main bedroom and then the social area of the house, located at the highest level..Due to the existing coast regulations all exterior walls are painted white and contention walls are veneered with concrete tiles. Frameworks have been finished in a steel blue look..”  Interesting form, interior volumes; extensive glazing..

See our posts on two other homes by Vertice Arquitectos:

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image: Courtesy of Vertice Arquitectos; article: “J4 Houses / Vertice Arquitectos” 02 May 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: House of Joyce & Jeroen by Personal Architecture

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 27 March 2013

House of Joyce & Jeroen by Personal Architecture

Residential Architecture: House of Joyce & Jeroen by Personal Architecture: “..The dilapidated state has necessitated a thorough reinforcement of the foundation and load-bearing structure of the entire house, opening up extraordinary possibilities in an otherwise commonplace apartment renovation..The combination of ambitious design visions and a large measure of trust from the client have resulted in a rigorous and uncompromising redesign, in which voids and split levels accentuate the full height of Den Haag, The Netherlands, typical row houses..The potential of the brick structure, the details such as glass-in-lead frames, and the characteristic “en-suite” room divisions were the deciding factors in purchasing the house, according to the clients. The tension between antique features and modern techniques is very evident in the redesign plan. The classical street façade is restored to its former glory, from ground to third floor..Behind the doors of the “en-suite“ element, a complete change is taking place. The rear façade is removed and clad with glass to a full height of 11 meters. The floor levels are detached from the façade, creating a void that spans three levels and generating an optimal source of daylight..In the back of the house, the load-bearing wall between the corridor and the living room  is replaced with a steel construction. Four new floors with a net height of 2,4 meters protrude from this construction. These floors remain openly linked to the existing floor levels. The interplay of voids, the split-levels and the glass façade, all create a spectacular drama between interior and exterior on the one hand, and between the existing and new floors on the other..The intervention in the back of the house can be interpreted as a three-dimensional, L-shaped element of five storeys, accessed by a new steel spiral staircase. The staircase brings a new dynamic between the different parts of the house and makes a separation between owners and guests possible. Vertically, the L-shaped element ends in a roof-terrace with jacuzzi and outer kitchen that lies far above the balconies of the lower floors..This rigorous redesign project has reorganized the total accessible surface of the house towards an excess of floor space, generating more rooms and more daylight. To the owner, the residence promises an extraordinary living experience. To passers-by, it cannot be distinguished from any other house on the van Merlenstraat..”  Outstanding redesign and renovation; extensive glazing, natural light; indoor / outdoor and contextual sensibility; interesting interior volumes, interplay and details..

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image: © René de Wit; article: “House of Joyce & Jeroen / Personal Architecture” 26 Mar 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: TreeHouse by FMD Architects

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 13 March 2013

TreeHouse by FMD Architects

Residential Architecture: TreeHouse by FMD Architects: “..The site is a residential block in Lorne, Victoria, Australia. Several large eucalypt trees are clustered in the southeastern end of the block, offering a treed streetscape context to the site. The house was to contain individual zones for the couple and their 2 adult daughters, with the opportunity to separate access between the spaces.  A large Living and Dining space with outdoor entertaining areas were required, within which all family members and friends could congregate. Another important brief requirement was a space in which the client could practice yoga, offering spatial isolation with an external outlook..The trees were to be retained as far as possible and their relationship with the building emphasised internally and externally. Views to the ocean were to be considered on equal terms with the views to and through the trees. The trees and associated root zones were also carefully analysed to ensure their health was not impacted by the new structure and setback accordingly..Planning constraints were stretched to their limit, maximising the site coverage of 35% and the setbacks particular to the area. Views from neighbouring properties were also an important consideration, with the building keeping a low profile at the rear of site to ensure it did not impact on its rear neighbours.As well as working around the trees, the multiple zones and the need for spaces, which allowed both isolation and congregation, were also major considerations..A particular client requirement was to allow internal and external spaces, within which yoga could be practiced. These spaces were to allow for physical isolation with an external outlook, allowing one to look within while understanding one’s position within the external context..The planning of the house aims to demonstrate that each participant perceives a different physical centre. As each user isolates themselves or interacts with another, the perception of their built environment and use thereof is adjusted, thus creating a continually shifting physical centre. This in turn relates to the process of yoga striving to achieve inner balance through movement and stillness.  Multiple private outdoor spaces are an example of this, as is the asymmetrical planning on the site in deference to the trees. The curved path from the main living to the main bedroom offers another example, as the external and internal walls between these spaces stretch themselves in 3 dimensions. Each joinery element between these spaces reinforces the tensed relationship through their form. In many ways the design aims to outline the importance of the process rather than achieving balance itself..”  Ample glazing, natural light, views; contextuality; indoor / outdoor sensibility..

See our post on another home by FMD Architects: Residential Architecture: South Eastern Residence by FMD Architects.

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image: © Shannon MacGrath; article: “TreeHouse / FMD Architects” 08 Mar 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: D House by Lode Architecture

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 20 February 2013

D House by Lode Architecture

Residential Architecture: D House by Lode Architecture: “..on the banks of the brackish water of a french estuary lies a house that breathes in the warmth of the surrounding woods. startling and elegant dualities characterize estuarine environments, places at the mouth of a river where fresh water meets the saline swirls of ocean water. these unique sites are among the most productive areas on earth. parisian architects jérôme vinçon and arnaud lacoste of lode architecture have sought to create an architecture that reflects these complex conditions. the fecundity of the landscape is expressed in the architectonics of ‘d house’ which include a contrasting skin comprised of untreated live-edge wood and glazing that wraps around the first level. a sizable retaining wall allows for the creation of a hollow space that becomes the conceptual crux of the house. this hearth can be opened to the panorama of the undergrowth; its spaces filled with the rushing sounds of the river and the smell of damp earth. the windowed angles fade into river views and the stone-worked ground trails off into the water’s banks. the second level further creates a blended landscape with wells of light and slivers of landscape peeking through a small succession of living spaces. these wooden trellises make an abstracted composition of forest when the leaves reflect off the abundant glazing. the house flits between dialectical sets, drawing strength through it’s embrace of the confrontational natural elements that characterize the site.. ”  Very nice site; extensive glazing, natural light, views; interesting form, exterior and interior materiality, indoor / outdoor sensibility..

image: © daniel moulinet, courtesy of lode architects; article: Designboom

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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