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Posts Tagged ‘Bates Masi + Architects’

* Residential Architecture: Sam’s Creek House by Bates Masi Architects

Posted by the editors on Friday, 1 February 2013

Sam’s Creek House by Bates Masi Architects

Residential Architecture: Sam’s Creek House by Bates Masi Architects: “..Bates Masi Architects have designed Sam’s Creek, located in Bridgehampton, New York, USA..We live in a time where smart phones and tablets are in everyone’s hands and multitasking is the normal way of life. Influenced from the client’s multitasking lifestyle, a diverse set of requirements developed for a new home. The clients, one of whom is the owner of a public relations company, requested that multiple activities could take place throughout the house without interruption; a dinner party could take place while simultaneously entertaining a group of children, or guests could come and go without disturbing the rest of the family. These programmatic requests diagrammatically divide the site as well as establish view corridors from front to back. Transparency through the house puts simultaneous activities on display, and provides a setting where guests can see and be seen..A series of open-ended boxes, each tailored to a portion of the architectural program focuses the view from the street though the house to the landscape in the rear. Mahogany boards wrap floors, ceilings, and walls to heighten the perspectival view and provide privacy from neighbors. Each box has independent audio, video, and climate control to operate autonomously and the length, height, and volume of each box is adjusted to appropriately encase the program. Interstitial spaces between the arranged boxes are gardens and patios. The overlap of the boxes creates thresholds that highlight interesting moments. With each box occupying a specific program, the multitasking of different events is achieved..With a limited material palette, travertine is used as flooring for the terraces and as cladding on portions of the open-ended boxes. To use the stone as an exterior cladding, a custom hanging system was designed. The travertine siding is captured at the top and bottom by a CNC wire formed frame and overlapped by the following course above. The proportion and repetition of the siding references the wood shingle vernacular ubiquitous in the area..The fireplace merges a utilitarian object and a crafted, sculptural work of art. The fireplace conceals a moment frame, supporting lateral loads to allow for the large open-ended volume of the dining and living room. It also houses a coat closet and the HVAC components. The overlapping, repeating bronze components were digitally fabricated and assembled on site. Different patina processes were studied to achieve the dark bronze facing the room and the polished bronze on the interior of the hood. Sunlight from above is reflected by the polished bronze and filters through the gaps from the overlapped construction. Similar construction methods were utilized for the master bedroom headboard using repeating strips of belting leather..The separation of program into individual volumes allows the multitasking lifestyle of the clients to continue into their home. Where multitasking on a daily basis can seem chaotic, a new order is developed by the architecture. The client’s new home allows them to keep up with their busy lifestyle while also providing respite from it..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, views; interesting materiality, interior volumes and details..

See our posts on six other homes by Bates Masi Architects:

image + article: Contemporist

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Robins Way House by Bates Masi Architects

Posted by the editors on Monday, 17 September 2012

Residential Architecture: Robins Way House by Bates Masi Architects: “..The clients, an interior designer and a DJ, requested a complete renovation and addition of a 1960’s kit house in Amagansett, NY, USA, to be a weekend retreat from their urban apartment. The clients gathered images of objects and conventional materials utilized in new, interesting ways as inspiration for the design. A single design solution that could unify the old remaining parts of the house to the new intervention was sought. This solution should solve acoustical, lighting, equipment coordination and simultaneously address the aesthetic décor requirements of the client’s collection of objects. A vocabulary was developed that allowed the patina and history that the client favored to remain and new experiences to evolve..The house was gutted and reduced down to the skeletal framework allowing the intervention to utilize the post and beam construction that remained. Between the existing ceiling joists, natural rope was woven through a digitally fabricated framework. Weaving patterns were used to signify different ceiling conditions. Lighting penetrates through a crossed weave of the rope. It transitions to a straight weave to shield speakers and utilities from view. Since the client is a DJ, sound is very important. The rope weave acts as an acoustic baffle absorbing background noise, but allows music from the ceiling mounted speakers to be emitted..To integrate with the décor, the rope was used structurally to support several items such as a large, custom steel framed mirror in the Master Bathroom and the Dining Room Chandelier. A large sliding door is woven with the same rope to provide privacy from the neighbors and shield the sun at various times of the day. The sunlight rakes through the openings casting linear shadows on the bathroom floor..Unifying the exterior is a dark stained cedar siding that wraps all of the exterior facades and transitions to the matching frames of the replaced windows and doors. The newly constructed interior walls and interior cabinetry were also resurfaced in reclaimed barn wood. Behind a sheet of glass, the same reclaimed wood lines the shower surround and one feels as though they are showering outdoors. The clients now have a quiet escape from city life..The frequent turnover within a vacation community can be wasteful. Some are eager to tear down what exists and start new. This project preserved the skeleton of the house and the history in the patinaed materials that the client desired. Conventional materials were utilized in new ways to unify the old and the new..”  Extensive glazing, natural light; interesting materiality and interior volumes and details..

See our posts on five other homes by Bates Masi Architects:

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image: Courtesy of Bates Masi Architects; article: Alarcon , Jonathan . “Robins Way / Bates Masi Architects” 13 Sep 2012. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/272230&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Pryor House by Bates Masi + Architects

Posted by the editors on Monday, 30 July 2012

Residential Architecture: Pryor House by Bates Masi + Architects: “..The house occupies a hill in Montauk  (Long Island, New York) with a distant view of ocean. A site that the owners, a couple with two young boys, spent years to find.  It is the couple’s reprieve from their home in the city, to share the outdoor lifestyle with their family and to remember their teenage years together in Montauk.   The house design prompts the owners to interact with the surrounding environment, evoking experiences of camping..A departure from typical residential planning, the house is entered through multiple areas for different guests and occasions. Large glass doors slide open to the living, dining and kitchen area for a large gathering, a smaller scaled swing door for an occasional guest opens to the center hall with a view of the ocean, and a sequence of auxiliary spaces – beach equipment area, outdoor shower, sand and mudroom – create a seamless ritual from the daily activities for the family and friends.  In all living areas and bedrooms, glass doors and insect screens slide in and out from pocket walls, transforming rooms to screened porches or spaces completely open to the landscape.  The living area, a double height space with kitchen, dining and living area, has thirty-six feet wide glass doors that pocket into southern and northern walls.  When open, the dining room becomes a picnic area and the living room fireplace becomes a campfire.  Multiple layers of bronzed metal fabric at the clerestory windows in the living area fold and unfold to adjust sunlight for optimal brightness & temperature of the space.  These operable architectural elements use the natural environment to create suitable living conditions..The house is environmentally friendly in its overall construction and planning with such specifics as geo-thermal heating & cooling, shading & venting systems, solar panels, organic finishes and materials.  Lending to the structure’s sustainability, the house is assembled, rather than built, with prefabricated foundation, panel siding and efficient built-ins minimizes construction debris or toxins such as concrete foundation tar on the site. With the owner’s initial premise of camping, the design and functionality of the house promotes a memorable experience for friends and family in the natural environment..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, clerestory windows; indoor / outdoor sensibility; sustainability; interesting interior volumes and interior decoration..

See our posts on four other homes by Bates Masi + Architects:

image: Bates Masi Architects; article: Arthitectural

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture, Solar Design, Sustainable Architecture, Sustainable Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

* Residential Architecture: Noyack Creek House by Bates Masi Architects

Posted by the editors on Monday, 18 June 2012

Residential Architecture: Noyack Creek House by Bates Masi Architects: “..a retreat for relaxation and casual entertaining on a restrictive narrow lot fronting the tidal estuary of Noyack Creek.  The house became a study in architectural theatre: a series of spaces in a carefully scripted sequence that subtly reflect his professional life.The path begins at the front door where perforated privacy screens slide apart like  a curtain, revealing the loft-like living and dining spaces.  The direction of the deck boards that make up the flooring is altered to demarcate the path through the space, emerging seamlessly to an exterior waterside deck..A broad stair to the second level, parallel with an interior stair along a glazed wall, acts as tiered seating for entertaining and looking at the water view beyond.  Beneath the stair, hidden backstage for maximum privacy, the guest room shares the water view through a nearly hidden sliding door.  Guests emerge as if through a trap door.Continuing up the stair to the second floor, the final destination is the master suite and balcony.  The master bedroom is connected to the bath by a bridge overlooking the public spaces below which are lit by the glazed stair wall.  Lined with a guardrail of stainless steel cables recalling a fly loft and catwalk, the path culminates in the master bedroom with its wall of glazing overlooking the water..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, views, privace; significant interior wood; interior bridge..

See our posts on three other homes by Bates Masi Architects:

image: © Bates Masi Architects;  article: Arthitectural

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Contemporary Architecture, Design, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

 
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