Designalog

……….design diversity……….

Posts Tagged ‘China’

* Architecture: Zaha Hadid: Changsha Meixihu International Culture & Art Center

Posted by the editors on Thursday, 7 March 2013

Zaha Hadid - Changsha Meixihu International Culture & Art Center

Architecture: Zaha Hadid: Changsha Meixihu International Culture & Art Center: “..the capital of the south central chinese province of hunan is in the midst of incredible population growth and rapid urban development.  at the center of a stimulus worth 130 billion USD is the idyllic meixihu lake, now primed for an ambitious set of cultural projects. zaha hadid’s winning design for the ‘changsha meixihu international culture and art center’ broke ground in october after distinguishing itself as a composition of serpentine curves forming a complex that contains a contemporary art museum, a multipurpose hall, a hotel, and various ancillary facilities. the central plaza emphasizes the pedestrian urban experience by helping to create incidental meeting areas and generating cultural capital in form of a sculpture garden and expansive exhibition space. views of the lake are framed by the museum’s three-petal form, unfurling around a central atrium. outward views are afforded by ribbons of glazing and balconies that serve the dual purpose of admitting daylight into the galleries. the multipurpose hall is a pointedly variable space, with public access to retail areas and restaurants nestled in a sunken courtyard. the focal point of the plan comes by way of the grand theater, slated to be the largest performance venue in the city with an 1800 seat capacity. new zealand-based acoustic engineers at marshall day won a december bid to optimize sound performance in the central auditorium. the three major programs, while discrete buildings, are linked by sinuous passageways, curved white planes and an architecture of baroque intonations..”

See some of our other posts on work by Zaha Hadid Architects:

image: © zaha hadid architects; article: Designboom

designalog : contact

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture & Design in China, Architecture + Design, Awards, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Cultural Architecture, Design, Designalog, Galleries, Hospitality Architecture, Mixed-Use Architecture, Product Design, Public Architecture, Public Facilities, Retail Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: WFH House by Arcgency

Posted by the editors on Tuesday, 26 February 2013

WFH House by Arcgency

Residential Architecture: WFH House by Arcgency: Arcgency have designed the WFH House in Wuxi, China.  “..The design is based on Nordic values. Not only according to architecture, but also design objects. These values are defined as: • Flexibility. • Build for people, human values. – Good daylight conditions, different types of light. • Reliable (long term) solutions. – Healthy materials, recyclable materials, design for disassembly strategies. • Materials that age gracefully. • Access to nature, greenery. • Minimalistic look. • Playfulness.  Sustainable global housing: The WFH concept is a modular concept, based on a design principle, using 40 feet high cube standard modules as structural system. The structure can be adapted to local challenges such as climatic or earthquake issues. Online customization-tools give clients the possibility to decide their own version of the house concerning layout, size, facade, interior etc. The configuration happens within a predefined framework that will ensure high architectural value and quality of materials. Building-components are prefabricated and on site construction can be limited..FLEX space: The FLEX space is the heart of the house. It contains the living room, kitchen and can be used for multiple purposes. Parts of the room are double height, creating perfect lighting conditions. The rest of the space is one storey height, defined by the landing that creates access to the spaces on the second floor. In each end of the FLEX space there is access to the surroundings and daylight. The boundary between inside and outside disappears, when the doors open. This is a fundamental part of the design; to be able to open let nature in. It is a consequence of having varying requirements for inside temperature and definitions of what domestic functions takes place inside and outside..Geometry: The geometry of the FLEX space is defined by the two rows of modules, and can easily be modified to specific wishes regarding size. The FLEX space has a number of possible solutions for subdivisions. Both on one plan or two plans. It can also be one big space, creating a lot of light and openness. The kitchen elements are built into the wall (into the technical module). It creates more floor space and also makes connection to water and plumbing easy. The kitchen can also be extended with at freestanding element, defining the work area of the kitchen. From the FLEX space there is access to all spaces. This eliminates square meters used for logistics. It is possible to make larger openings from the FLEX space into the rooms, again creating flexible solutions within the same system..The size of the bedrooms is defined by the half of a module (15m2). There are four bedrooms, and they can be used for multiple purposes: A parent’s bedroom, kid’s bedroom, workspace etc. Three of the bedrooms have windows on two facades, creating a mixed light. It is possible to remove the wall, or part of it, facing the FLEX space. This adds flexibility to the layout and shows the structural systems ability to adapt do different needs..The landing creates access to the second floor, but can also be used as a space for play, relaxation or work. It gives the inhabitant the possibility to draw back, but still enjoy the company of people in the house. You are in the FLEX space, but because you are on the first floor you are drawn back from the action. It is an ideal place for a quiet retreat and still being able to observe what is going on in the house..”  Ample glazing, natural light, views; interesting modular concept and interior volumes..

designalog : contact

image: © Jens Markus Lindhe; article: “WFH House / Arcgency” 21 Feb 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture & Design in China, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Interiors, Prefab Design, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Absolute Towers by MAD

Posted by the editors on Tuesday, 18 December 2012

Absolute Towers by MAD

Residential Architecture:  Absolute Towers by MAD: “..Chinese firm MAD has completed a pair of curvaceous twisted skyscrapers in the growing city of Mississauga, Canada..Standing at 170 and 150 metres, the Absolute Towers contain apartments on each of their oval-shaped floors, but every storey is incrementally rotated to give both buildings a curved and twisted outline..“The concept of the tower at the beginning was very simple,” said MAD founder Ma Yansong. “We just wanted to make something organic but different, more natural and more soft and not something too strong that would remind people of money or power.”..Mississauga first developed as a suburb of Toronto but has grown in recent decades and was named as a city in 1974. Since then, high-rise developments have sprung up across the city and the architects were keen to avoid designing another of these “listless, boxy buildings”..“Lots of cities like this are happening in China, just repeating the modern urban typology and always making square towers,” added Yansong. “We were thinking; how about reversing that? “So we don’t treat architecture as a product, or an artificial volume or space. It’s more like a landscape.”..MAD won a competition to design the buildings in 2006, which were initially dubbed “the Marylyn Monroe towers” by local residents in reference to their shapely bodies..Apartments in both towers boast panoramic views of the city skyline from continuous balconies that wrap around the recessed glass facades. This set-back also helps to shade each apartment from direct sunlight in the summer months..”  Interesting forms..

See our posts on other work by MAD: Residential Architecture: Huangshan Mountain Village by MAD and Architecture: Architecture in China: Ordos Museum by MAD.

image: Iwan Baan; article: Dezeen

designalog : contact

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture & Design in China, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,836 other followers

%d bloggers like this: