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Posts Tagged ‘Cross # Towers by BIG Architects (Bjarke Ingels Group)’

* Residential Architecture: BIG’s West 57th New York City “Pyramid” Wins Final Approval (Bjarke Ingels Group)

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 10 February 2013

BIG’s West 57th New York City “Pyramid” Wins Final Approval

Residential Architecture: BIG’s West 57th New York City “Pyramid” Wins Final Approval: “..After an “arduous” public review and a heated debate over affordable housing, New York’s City Council has unanimously awarded final approval to BIG’s tetrahedral-shaped West 57th apartment building in Manhattan. As reported by Crain’s New York Business, a compromise has been made to include 173 affordable housing units within the 32-story, 750-unit residential building and the neighboring industrial building that will be converted into 100 additional rental apartments. As you may recall, the community board and Councilwoman Gail Brewer initially threatened to “torpedo the project” if the apartments were only made affordable for a 35 year period. However, Durst apparently won them over by contributing one million dollars into an affordable housing fund..“The good news, which is the mantra of my office and community board No. 4, is there will be, yes, by law, 35 years of income-restricted affordable housing,” stated City Councilwoman Brewer, who represents the area..Dubbed W57, the unique project was “born of logic”, as New York Magazine’s Justin Davidson would describe. Its steeply sloped facade will feature a massive, football-sized courtyard with stunning Hudson River views and outdoor terraces for all 750 residents, along with a vibrant street life and close proximity to the Hudson River Park.. Work is already underway on excavating the lot, and move ins are expected by spring 2015..”  Article includes a video..

See our posts on other projects by BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group):

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image: Courtesy of BIG; article: Rosenfield , Karissa. “BIG’s West 57th “Pyramid” Wins Final Approval” 07 Feb 2013. ArchDaily

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* Residential Architecture: Marina Lofts by BIG (Bjarke Ingels)

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 19 January 2013

Marina Lofts by BIG (Bjarke Ingels)

Residential Architecture: Marina Lofts by BIG (Bjarke Ingels): “..The mixed-use development, Marina Lofts, in downtown Fort Lauderdale, Florida, US, seeks to infuse a currently run-down stretch along the New River with a thriving pedestrian friendly public space thereby attracting new residents into its development. Totaling 1,000 rental apartments, 10,000 sq ft of restaurants and 25,000 sq ft of retail, the mixed-use development is broken into three phases. The Florida-based developer, Asi Cymbal, expects the project to have a positive long-term economic benefit to the city and local community of Fort Lauderdale..“Our intent here is to create a world class project that will serve as a model for architecture, creativity, and energy along the most prime stretch of waterfront in Downtown Fort Lauderdale,” says Asi Cymbal, owner of Cymbal Development..Situated in an industrial gap in Fort Lauderdale’s Riverwalk park, Marina Lofts stitches together the final arm of the currently fragmented public space along the New River. BIG’s design frames the space with a generous public promenade bounded towards south by a 3-phase series of residential towers, creating public life along the riverfront while maintaining the existing marine activities of Fort Lauderdale. The two initial housing towers are treated as one continuous building “breaking” at the center to form an opening which allows maximum pedestrian activity to flow between the buildings and extends the city life out to the waterfront..“The project fills the gap in the waterfront of Downtown Fort Lauderdale stitching the existing fragments of promenade together into a new and revitalized river park adding density and life to the scenic setting. The two buildings are torn open to form  a cave and a canyon –opening up for the neighborhood to reach the river . A design made through subtraction rather than addition” Bjarke Ingels, Founding Partner, BIG..As both towers ascend, the crack between them allows for flexibility in apartment sizes by liberating the units from the structural grid and enabling living spaces to scale up or down as desired. The solid infill of the void maintains privacy between units by directing the windows in carefully-orchestrated locations..The site of the third tower is currently home to a 250-boat garage which remains intact as the future tower straddles the entrance to the garage door allowing boats to easily pass back and forth beneath its legs. The existing water taxi station is augmented with shading structures and permanent pavilions to further activate the connection across the river. The waterfront will be a lushly landscaped park with ample setbacks from the water to provide more public space for the South Riverwalk. A café, retail and commercial spaces will occupy the lower levels of the building, bringing life and activity to the neighborhood. In a city where daily life shifts seamlessly between water and land, Marina Lofts augments both, contributing to the vibrant density and connected public space along the New River..The historical Rain Tree in the city, highly treasured by the local community is preserved and given a more prominent position by relocating and re-framing it as a centerpiece to a new Rain Tree park along the promenade. The construction of the first phase is expected to commence in December 2013..”

See our posts on other projects by BIG (Bjarke Ingels):

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image: Courtesy of BIG; article: Saieh , Nico. “Marina Lofts / BIG” 11 Jan 2013. ArchDaily.  http://www.archdaily.com/317365

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Hospitality Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Mixed-Use Architecture, Residential Architecture, Retail Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

* Architecture: Miami: America’s Next Great Architectural City?

Posted by the editors on Friday, 14 December 2012

Miami - America’s Next Great Architectural City...

Architecture: Miami: America’s Next Great Architectural City?: “..Miami, Florida is booming with new architectural projects by big names: everything from new condominums by BIG, to the restoration of the Saxony Hotel by Rem Koolhaas, to the new Miami Beach Convention Center. So why are so many big projects migrating to Miami Beach? The city is turning itself into an American cultural and civic center..Take, for example, the cultural institutions along Lincoln Road. The new addition of Herzog & de Meuron’s Parking Garage satisfies a necessity while also providing a rich, cultural gathering space, thanks to its designed social functions. The architecture breaks out from the anticipated form of the “concrete box for cars” and instead turns it into something that fits within the context of the neighborhood, physically and programmatically. The firm will also be expanding the Miami Art Museum, scheduled to reopen as the new Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) in 2013..There are also many cultural restoration projects in the works. The Bacardi Building, a modernist tower designed by Enrique Gutierrez in 1969 will be restored by Frank Gehry to house studios, offices and housing for artists of the National Young Arts Foundation. The exterior, which features a rich mosaic, will remain untouched. The Saxony Hotel will be restored by developer Alan Faena in collaboration with Rem Koolhaas, situated across from a new Norman Foster tower in Miami Beach. The design is still under wraps, but it’s a highly anticipated addition to the urban fabric..What is it about Miami that is motivating developers to bring in renowned architects? In an article in Architect Magazine by Ian Volner, architects Herzog & de Meuron admit that the culture, weather, food and community are major attractions for Miami. But its history of Art Deco architecture and its obsession with air-conditioned, indoor spaces, are some of the negative characteristics that their new design for the Miami Art Museum hope to address. In their design, the heavy temple-like structure of the exterior is offset by the openness of the interior spaces, the abundance of hanging vegetation, and ample shaded outdoor spaces. Note those motifs, and recognize them even in the parking garage on 1111 Lincoln Road. Like the Miami Art Museum, Herzog & de Meuron’s design for the parking garage incorporates as much outdoor space as possible, shading, and vegetation..With the real estate market in Miami booming, the city has the opportunity to reinvent itself with a contemporary architecture, a refined sense of culture and community and with the assistance of talented and respected architects and designers.   We look forward to watching as these projects develop..”

See some of our posts on Miami:

And see some of our posts on BIG (Bjarke Ingels):

image: Coconut Grove Condo by BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group); Image via DesignBoom; article: Vinnitskaya , Irina. “Miami: America’s Next Great Architectural City?” 11 Dec 2012. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/304460&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, Cultural Architecture, Design, Designalog, Hospitality Architecture, Institutional Architecture, Mixed-Use Architecture, Museums, Public Facilities, Residential Architecture, Retail Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

* Architecture: Natural History Museum Proposal by BIG Architects (Bjarke Ingels)

Posted by the editors on Monday, 6 August 2012

Architecture: Natural History Museum Proposal by BIG Architects (Bjarke Ingels): “..BIG Architects‘ proposal for the new natural history museum in denmark is a man-made mineral landscape which adapts to the organic forms of the botanical garden situated in the centre of copenhagen where the institution is located – their extension is a formation of rocks which intersect with the surrounding green park landscape..above ground, the site’s existing geological garden stands as the public entrance plaza where all services and activities are housed below the overhead perforated stone surface of the new annex. the botanical garden is an addition to the current romantic garden on the premises. this green space gets a discreet cut into the surrounding environment providing garden views from the interior of the structure, while also offering glimpses into the galleries themselves from the exterior..both the geological and botanical gardens incorporate exhibition functions underground..the two main programs of the building are the grand whale hall and greenhouses, both of which are sunken into the land and shaped by the structural grid, incorporating exhibition functions underground..the public scopes are housed at ground level making them easily accessible. the grand whale hall – which exhibits some of the oldest skeletons found on earth – becomes the new heart of the museum. the first subterranean level connects all of the buildings already on site to form a continuous exhibition loop which starts and ends with this central area. the galleries and greenhouses within this section receive daylight through skylights in the landscape. the second subgrade level encompasses all spaces which don’t require any daylight intake such as storage spaces and light-sensitive exhibitions..”

See our posts on other work by BIG Architects (Bjarke Ingels):

image: courtesy of BIG; article: Designboom

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Cultural Architecture, Design, Designalog, Galleries, Interiors, Museums | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

 
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