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Posts Tagged ‘Green Design’

* Residential Architecture: Green Box by act_romegialli

Posted by the editors on Tuesday, 28 May 2013

Green Box by act_romegialli

Residential Architecture: Green Box by act_romegialli: “..This glazed garden hideaway in Italy by Italian studio act_romegialli is disguised inside a dense thicket of bushy plants and blossoming wildflowers..The little building previously functioned as a garage for a weekend retreat in the Raethian Alps, but act_romegialli was asked to convert it into a space where the owner can keep gardening tools, prepare meals and entertain guests..Retaining the rustic stone walls and columns of the old garage, the architects installed a galvanised metal framework with a skeletal pitched roof, then added glazed panels to infill openings on each of the walls..Steel wires strung up around the structure help a selection of deciduous plants to climb over the facade, plus a mixture of annual and perennial shrubs are planted around its base, providing a constant blanket of exterior greenery..The interior of the building is divided into two rooms, both with weather-beaten larch floors and exposed concrete ceilings. The kitchen is constructed from galvanised steel and features a sink with metal pipes for taps..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, garden views; lovely garden pavilion; original article features a five-image slideshow and many additional images..

image: Marcello Mariana; article: Dezeen

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Green Design, Interior Design, Interiors, Landscape Architecture, Residential Architecture, Slide Shows, Sustainable Architecture, Sustainable Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Architecture: Stamp House by Charles Wright Architects

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 2 March 2013

Stamp House by Charles Wright Architects

Architecture: Stamp House by Charles Wright Architects: “..CWA were approached by the project client to deliver a carbon neutral (in operation) solution for an environmentally sensitive site off-grid on the edge of the FNQ beachfront rainforest. The aim was not to simply produce an engineered outcome but produce a building which made the most of the sites natural amenity and re-introduced the surrounding native wetland environment. The building is literally reflected by way of its siting over an engineered water ecosystem which was the result of lengthy liaison & collaboration with National Parks, Environmental Agencies, State and Local Government..The design is formed in an innovative combination of in-situ and precast concrete. The concrete has been engineered & insulated incorporating a total solar panelled roof to provide for a constant cooler & more comfortable ambient temperature year-round. The design utilises massive cantilevers to mitigate impact from potential flooding & king tide inundation associated with cyclonic activity. The project has been designed to be solid and to withstand intense cyclones..ESD initiatives include: total 250,000 ltr water harvesting, recycling & reticulation, renewable solar energy generation with solar backup non-reliant on fossil fuel backup generation, On-site Advanced Tertiary Sewerage treatment plant, grey water recycling & irrigation, Shaded & Insulated Thermal mass engineering, ‘green’ cooling & energy conservation controlled via building automation system (CBUS)..  Interesting form; contextuality; green design..

See another building by Charles Wright Architects:  Architecture: Cairns Botanic Gardens Visitors Centre by Charles Wright Architects.

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image: © Patrick Bingham Hall; article: “Stamp House / Charles Wright Architects” 25 Feb 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Cultural Architecture, Design, Designalog, green, Green Design, Prefab Design, Public Architecture, Public Facilities, Public Parks, Solar Design, Sustainable Architecture, Sustainable Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: S11 House by ArchiCentre

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 9 January 2013

S11 House by ArchiCentre

Residential Architecture: S11 House by ArchiCentre: “..The S11 house is located in an established older suburb of Petaling Jaya, Malaysia. The existing old house on the site was built in the early 1960’s and had become dilapidated and run-down over the years. A new green tropical house was planned for the site and conceptualized along the lines of a tree. The large tree canopy would cover and shelter the living spaces underneath it. The S11 House was designed to achieve the highest level Platinum rating of Malaysia’s Green Building Index (GBI)..There were five significant existing trees on the site. Three very old and sculptural frangipanis, a large star-fruit and a coconut palm tree. All these were retained and the new house was set in the midst of them. Much of the demolished old house materials were re-used. Old crushed concrete roof tiles for gravel fill, old clay bricks were cleaned and re-used for feature walls, roofing timbers were used for formwork strutting and propping, old steel were all sold off to steel yards, crushed concrete and cement aprons were re-used for backfilling aggregate..The S11 house has a clear north-south orientation for all its openings and windows. The east and west walls were deliberately void of any significant glazed openings and were constructed of better insulated aerated light weight concrete blocks. In addition they were coated in heat reflecting paint in camouflage motif and also shaded by a wire netting screen wall of fruit and vegetable climbers. These would help to reduce much of the heat gain through the east and west walls. The large tree-like canopy roof is constructed of lightweight recyclable profiled steel metal sheets coated in a light off-white colour to minimize heat absorption..The roof insulation comprises 200mm thick 50kg/m3 rockwool and two layers of heat reflective foil. A 200mm thick ventilated air space is left between the metal ceiling lining and the rockwool to further improve heat insulation. The overall roof U value is an impressive 0.14. The glazing comprises 9.38mm thick low-E safety laminated glass with a 90% openable area. The overall building envelope OTTV is 29.63..A specially designed wind turbine combined with a steel framed glazed pyramid provides the house with “stack effect” ventilation and light pipes. These 15 numbers of turbines are driven both by wind as well as convection when the air within the glass pyramids heat up as a result of the greenhouse effect. A 3 degree differential is enough to spin the turbines by convection. The large canopy roof is pitched at 5 degrees to facilitate self cleaning of roofing material and solar panels. A 5 KW peak photovoltaic installation is mounted unto the large canopy roof and the generated electricity is sold back into the national electric grid. The solar hot water heaters are also located on the large roof area..Rainwater collected on the canopy roof drains directly into the series of rainwater harvesting tanks. These are aligned in series for sedimentation control and the water from the last tank is used for all the toilet flushing, gardening and car washing requirements. All the tap fittings and sanitary wares have water saving and reduction valves..The majority of the house has bare natural finishes – raw off-form concrete walls and ceilings, cement plastered walls without paint and natural fair-faced common red clay brickwork. Stonework for bathrooms, driveway and Ground Floor living areas all come from project rejects. The timber flooring and upper decks are all Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified whilst the ground floor decking timbers are old recycled chengal collected over many years. Limited surfaces are painted with Low VOC paints. All internal joinery work has low VOC content and also water based glues. The 1m X 1m modular book shelves are all made from recycled waste plywood off-cuts with low VOC coatings and water based glues. The modules are stackable and can be relocated with ease in the boot of a car..The double volume Family room is located on the first floor and the 7m high full sliding glass walls facilitate maximum cross ventilation whilst also opening up the entire internal living space unto the outdoor deck. Lighting for the house are predominantly energy saving T5 tubes, LEDs and compact fluorescents. The house has full home office capability with Cat5 fibre-optics and broadband connections. The swimming pool and koi pond are located at the two extreme north-south ends and provide evaporative cooling for the house. Blackwater is treated in the onsite sewerage treatment plant and the recycled water is used for garden irrigation. A composting yard treats all the household organic and garden wastes and provides high grade compost fertilizer for the vegetable and fruit gardens. All new trees and plants are tropical natives that are generally maintenance free and suitable for the Malaysian climate..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, ventilation; interesting materiality, details, interior volumes and contextual sensibility; extensive green design inspiration, conception and details..

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image: © Lin Ho;article: “S11 House / ArchiCentre” 02 Jan 2013. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/313041&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Green Design, Interiors, lighting, Residential Architecture, Solar Design, Sustainable Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Sycamore House by Kovac Architects

Posted by the editors on Tuesday, 11 December 2012

Sycamore House by Kovac Architects

Residential Architecture: Sycamore House by Kovac Architects: “..Designed as the home of firm Principal Michael Kovac, Sycamore House serves as a laboratory for the firm’s ongoing research into sustainable architecture and a showcase for Kovac’s design philosophy. The home’s seamless integration of environmental systems and green materials has made it one of the first in California to garner Platinum Certification from the USGBC LEED for Homes Program..Sycamore House takes its name from three beautiful trees on the site that originally attracted Kovac to the property; the simple geometry of the house is driven by the steeply descending site. Nestled into the downhill side of a ridge top street, the 3,400 square-foot home presents a deceptively modest one-story face to the street, while a view from below reveals a series of sculpted volumes over three floors. Inspired by the surrounding sycamores, Kovac commissioned artist Jill Sykes to turn the minimal street facade of recycled fiber cement panels into a canvas into which her subtle shadow patterns were etched..A 23-foot tall interior concrete wall anchors Sycamore House to its site and organizes the house formally and functionally. The wall’s weighty presence provides an elegant counterpoint to a delicate cantilevered stair connecting the upper living spaces to private spaces below. Its thermal mass helps to regulate air temperature while its vertical expanse encourages natural ventilation, both guiding warm air to clerestory windows and drawing cool canyon breezes from below..Photovoltaic panels provide for nearly all of the house’s power needs, and a green roof insulates the home and reduces storm water runoff. The house also employs an array of sustainable materials, including high fly ash content concrete, Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified woods, reclaimed wood flooring, zero-VOC paints, recycled glass tile, formaldehyde-free plywood, and high efficiency plumbing fixtures and appliances..The effort toward maximum sustainability extended beyond the design of the new home to encompass the ‘deconstruction’ of the existing house on the site. Prior to its removal, site vegetation was cleared by a herd of grazing goats. Interior fixtures and appliances were removed and donated to Habitat for Humanity, while framing lumber was re-used elsewhere in low-income construction. Overseen by The Reuse People, a nonprofit corporation dedicated to keeping usable building materials out of landfills, the process repurposed a minimum 75% of the existing building material..”   Interesting form, interior volumes; ample glazing, natural light; sustainability; LEED certification..  Article includes a 5 minute video..

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image: © Lisa Romerein; article: “Sycamore House / Kovac Architects” 05 Dec 2012. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/302288&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Green Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture, Solar Design, Sustainable Architecture, Sustainable Design, Video | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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