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Posts Tagged ‘hiroshi ueda’

* Residential Architecture: House in Hamadayama by K+S Architects

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 21 July 2012

Residential Architecture: House in Hamadayama by K+S Architects: “..“Retreat” becomes the keyword..I use  the bare concrete wall around to protect the living space from outside environment..I set the Core Tower in the center of the house and I let  the living space stream and spatially continue with clinging to the Tower..In the space isolated from the outside world, I try to  form the characteristically different space surrounding the Core Tower..Besides it, I make it very open architectonics and the movable  partitions enable the whole house to be a one  large (connected) room..This also makes you sense and feel the presence of two big tortoises  which are the member of the family anywhere in the house..Whereas the house at a glance might give a subtle closed  expression in the town, indeed creates a warm and gracious atmosphere at night  by a light leaks  out from the oval aperture of the aluminum panel..”  Privacy, lightwells, filtered natural light, interesting interior volumes..

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image: © Hiroshi Ueda; article: “House in Hamadayama / K+S Architects” 14 Apr 2010. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/56037&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Wind-dyed House by acaa

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 21 July 2012

Residential Architecture: Wind-dyed House by acaa: “..located halfway up a cliff, overlooking the ocean. Thick clumps of trees that grow along the slope of the land surrounding the house cast a series of organic silhouettes that make the slope seem to come alive. We decided that the appropriate form to build would be as low-lying as possible, while also allowing the architecture to become embedded in the surrounding landscape according to the contours of the terrain. This would allow us to minimize the impact of the building on its environment. The design of the walls plays an important role in creating the overall sense of presence that a building projects. As such, we also tried to prevent the walls of this house from becoming surfaces that would obstruct or impede movement and sight..Glass and screens along the enclosed perimeter of the house gives the second floor of this residence a certain transparency. Slender, deep-set eaves cast deep shadows on the facade of the building, softening the impact of the building’s physical presence in relation to its environment..The various components of the building were structured in order to allow the inhabitants to enjoy a different view of the outside on each level. The first floor features a stone floor and concrete walls finished with plaster, while the Japanese paper screens fitted inside the glass reflect the shadows of plants and trees. The hard-edged surfaces and finishes coexist with the soft, muted tones of the Japanese paper..The second storey, in contrast, features an open-plan living space, the entirety of which can be opened up towards the ocean. A series of wide eaves stand between the outside of the house and the interior, which is articulated into smaller sections by a row of pillars. Going down the staircase-shaped terrace allows one to gradually draw closer to the outdoor landscape. The section that divides the two different elevations on this floor provides seating throughout, functioning as a unique Japanese-style verandah (engawa). A steel-reinforced concrete structure was used for the second floor, and a Vierendeel bridge structure allowed us to float a large, thin roof on top. The pillars consist of square cylindrical poles (measuring 75mm across) made of solid iron arranged in a densely packed formation using wooden modules (900 x 1800mm). By creating several areas of low-level rigidity, we were able to do away with the need for braces..”  Extensive glazing, filtered natural light, views; indoor / outdoor sensibility, interesting interior volumes; wood screens, flooring, ceilings..

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image: © Hiroshi Ueda; article: “Wind-dyed house / acaa” 20 Jul 2012. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/255532&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Yakumo Apartments by Hidetaka Shirako Architect & Associates + OUVI

Posted by the editors on Monday, 16 July 2012

Residential Architecture: Yakumo Apartments by Hidetaka Shirako Architect & Associates + OUVI: “.. the design consists of four free-standing volumes that are arranged in an offset fashion to integrate pockets of outdoor space into the layout..conceived as a collection of small houses, the project offers four apartment units and individual outdoor gardens. the void spaces give off the impression of having been excised out of a larger collective volume, being finished in a lighter paneling to the dark metallic skin of the residences. offering two levels of living space, the interior utilizes a simple, open-concept layout. large windows face out to the gardens, establishing an active dialogue with the outdoors. though autonomous structures, the individual apartments remain linked through verandas..”  Interior courtyard, thoughtful fenestration, adequate natural light, privacy, interesting interior volumes, spiral staircases..

See our posts on residences by OUVI:

image: © hiroshi ueda, courtesy hidetaka shirako architect & associates; article: Designboom

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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