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Posts Tagged ‘Iwan Baan’

* Residential Architecture: X House by Cadaval & Solà-Morales

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 24 February 2013

X House by Cadaval & Solà-Morales

Residential Architecture: X House by Cadaval & Solà-Morales: “..This X-shaped house by architects Cadaval & Sola-Morales hangs over the edge of a hillside on the outskirts of Barcelona, Spain..Aptly named X House, the two-storey residence is based on a simple rectilinear form but features four triangular recesses that create the X-shaped plan. One of these recesses allows the structure to avoid a nearby tree, while two others provide windows that avoid overlooking neighbouring houses and the fourth lengthens the glazed facade to offer a wider view of the surrounding landscape..”The form is not a priori, but an effort to give a unitary response that satisfies each of the questions that rose up in the design process,” explains Cadaval & Solà-Morales..The walls without glazing appear as solid, undecorated concrete and were set using a single-sided formwork. “[The house] accumulates in its skin the diverse and continuous knowledge acquired within the process of construction,” say the architects..Residents enter the house on the top floor by following a staircase around the edge of the pine tree and locating a door that is two metres below street level, alongside a garage for parking two cars..A bedroom, bathroom and study occupy two arms of the cross on this floor and overlook a double-height living room on the storey below..Downstairs, the living room and kitchen wrap around the facade to offer views out across over the hillside..”X House uses form to qualify spaces of very different nature and provide them with an individual character, always incorporating landscape as a main actor,” add the architects..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, views; very interesting form, interior volumes, contextuality on a steep site; roof terrace; very good photos, some by the excellent photographer Iwan Baan, in a 20-image slideshow accompanying the original article.

image: Sandra Pereznieto; article: Dezeen

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interiors, Photography, Residential Architecture, Slide Shows | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Absolute Towers by MAD

Posted by the editors on Tuesday, 18 December 2012

Absolute Towers by MAD

Residential Architecture:  Absolute Towers by MAD: “..Chinese firm MAD has completed a pair of curvaceous twisted skyscrapers in the growing city of Mississauga, Canada..Standing at 170 and 150 metres, the Absolute Towers contain apartments on each of their oval-shaped floors, but every storey is incrementally rotated to give both buildings a curved and twisted outline..“The concept of the tower at the beginning was very simple,” said MAD founder Ma Yansong. “We just wanted to make something organic but different, more natural and more soft and not something too strong that would remind people of money or power.”..Mississauga first developed as a suburb of Toronto but has grown in recent decades and was named as a city in 1974. Since then, high-rise developments have sprung up across the city and the architects were keen to avoid designing another of these “listless, boxy buildings”..“Lots of cities like this are happening in China, just repeating the modern urban typology and always making square towers,” added Yansong. “We were thinking; how about reversing that? “So we don’t treat architecture as a product, or an artificial volume or space. It’s more like a landscape.”..MAD won a competition to design the buildings in 2006, which were initially dubbed “the Marylyn Monroe towers” by local residents in reference to their shapely bodies..Apartments in both towers boast panoramic views of the city skyline from continuous balconies that wrap around the recessed glass facades. This set-back also helps to shade each apartment from direct sunlight in the summer months..”  Interesting forms..

See our posts on other work by MAD: Residential Architecture: Huangshan Mountain Village by MAD and Architecture: Architecture in China: Ordos Museum by MAD.

image: Iwan Baan; article: Dezeen

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture & Design in China, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Architecture: Perot Museum of Nature and Science by Morphosis

Posted by the editors on Friday, 30 November 2012

Architecture: Perot Museum of Nature and Science by Morphosis: “..Museums, armatures for collective societal experience and cultural expression, present new ways of interpreting the world. They contain knowledge, preserve information and transmit ideas; they stimulate curiosity, raise awareness and create opportunities for exchange. As instruments of education and social change, museums have the potential to shape our understanding of ourselves and the world in which we live..As our global environment faces ever more critical challenges, a broader understanding of the interdependence of natural systems is becoming more essential to our survival and evolution. Museums dedicated to nature and science play a key role in expanding our understanding of these complex systems..The new Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Victory Park will create a distinct identity for the Museum, enhance the institution’s prominence in Dallas and enrich the city’s evolving cultural fabric. Designed to engage a broad audience, invigorate young minds, and inspire wonder and curiosity in the daily lives of its visitors, the Museum will cultivate a memorable experience that will persist in the minds of its visitors and that will ultimately broaden individuals’ and society’s understanding of nature and science..The Museum will strive to achieve the highest standards of sustainability possible for a building of its type. High performance design and incorporation of state of the art technologies will yield a new building that will minimize its impact on the environment..This world class facility will inspire awareness of science through an immersive and interactive environment that actively engages visitors. Rejecting the notion of museum architecture as neutral background for exhibits, the new building itself becomes an active tool for science education. By integrating architecture, nature, and technology, the building demonstrates scientific principles and stimulates curiosity in our natural surroundings..The immersive experience of nature within the city begins with the visitor’s approach to the museum, which leads through two native Texas ecologies: a forest of large native canopy trees and a terrace of native desert xeriscaping. The xeriscaped terrace gently slopes up to connect with the museum’s iconic stone roof. The overall building mass is conceived as a large cube floating over the site’s landscaped plinth. An acre of undulating roofscape comprised of rock and native drought-resistant grasses reflects Dallas’s indigenous geology and demonstrates a living system that will evolve naturally over time..The intersection of these two ecologies defines the main entry plaza, a gathering and event area for visitors and an outdoor public space for the city of Dallas. From the plaza, the landscaped roof lifts up to draw visitors through a compressed space into the more expansive entry lobby. The topography of the lobby’s undulating ceiling reflects the dynamism of the exterior landscape surface, blurring the distinction between inside and outside, and connecting the natural with the manmade..Moving from the compressed space of the entry, a visitor’s gaze is drawn upward through the soaring open volume of the sky-lit atrium, the building’s primary light-filled circulation space, which houses the building’s stairs, escalators and elevators. From the ground floor, a series of escalators bring patrons though the atrium to the uppermost level of the museum. Patrons arrive at a fully glazed balcony high above the city, with a bird’s eye view of downtown Dallas. From this sky balcony, visitors proceed downward in a clockwise spiral path through the galleries. This dynamic spatial procession creates a visceral experience that engages visitors and establishes an immediate connection to the immersive architectural and natural environment of the museum..The path descending from the top floor through the museum’s galleries weaves in and out of the building’s main circulation atrium, alternately connecting the visitor with the internal world of the museum and with the external life of the city beyond. The visitor becomes part of the architecture, as the eastern facing corner of the building opens up towards downtown Dallas to reveal the activity within. The museum, is thus, a fundamentally public building – a building that opens up, belongs to and activates the city; ultimately, the public is as integral to the museum as the museum is to the city..”  Article includes excellent photos by the renowned architectural photographer Iwan Baan..

See our post on another project by Morphosis: Residential Architecture: The FLOAT House – Make it Right by Morphosis Architects.

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image: ©Iwan Baan, Courtesy of Morphosis; article: “Perot Museum of Nature and Science / Morphosis” 20 Nov 2012. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/295662&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Cultural Architecture, Design, Designalog, Museums | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Architecture + Photography: New York After the Storm by Iwan Baan

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 7 November 2012

Architecture + Photography:  New York After the Storm by Iwan Baan: “..this set of images by Dutch architectural photographer Iwan Baan shows the scene in New York over the past week as the city recovers from the effects of Hurricane Sandy that swept across Manhattan last Monday, cutting the electricity and flooding the streets and subways..Iwan Baan also photographed the city from the air, creating a striking photograph that made the cover of New York Magazine..The image shows part of the city in darkness, while the rest is is filled with light and colour. “It was the only way to show that New York was two cities, almost,” Baan told Poynter magazine. “One was almost like a third world country where everything was becoming scarce. Everything was complicated. And then another was a completely vibrant, alive New York.”..A week later the city is now getting back to normal, with power mostly restored, schools reopening and subways running again..Earlier this year Iwan Baan photographed a vertical slum in Venezuela for an exhibition that won the Golden Lion for best project at the Venice Architecture Biennale..”   Excellent, as are most of Iwan Baan’s photos..  Original article includes a 21-image slideshow..

See some of our posts with photos by Iwan Baan:

image: Iwan Baan; article: Dezeen

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Posted in Architecture, Architecture + Design, Awards, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Cultural Architecture, Design, Designalog, Exhibitions, Landscape Architecture, lighting, Photography, Public Architecture, Public Facilities, Public Parks, Slide Shows, Urban Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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