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Posts Tagged ‘Low VOC’

* Residential Architecture: Burton Residence by Marmol Radziner

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 1 June 2013

Burton Residence by Marmol Radziner

Residential Architecture: Burton Residence by Marmol Radziner: “..This vacation home is set on the crest of a grassy knoll on a 160-acre site in Mendocino County, California, USA. The goal was to preserve and enhance the natural beauty of the property by siting the retreat in a careful, simple, and unobtrusive manner. The 10-module home forms an L-shaped plan, framing views of a canopy of mature oak trees to the south and east..The road leading to the house climbs the hill and ends at the carport at the home’s west end. A set of concrete stairs lead up a gentle grade from the carport to the entry deck, which runs along the north side of the home. The main volume is oriented east to west and arranged in an open plan. The living room, kitchen, and dining room collectively open southward onto a covered patio with an outdoor fireplace and pool area. From the main volume, the master bedroom extends to the north, following the edge of the hilltop and ending in a private deck that takes in the morning light from the east..Long Valley Ranch utilizes a number of sustainable strategies and materials. Passive solar heating and cooling are achieved through use of concrete flooring, covered decks, and natural through breezes. A 17-kW solar array offsets the electricity usage of the house, and a tankless hot water heater provides on-demand water heating. Sustainable materials are used throughout, including recycled denim insulation and low-VOC paint..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, views; contextuality; sustainability..

See our posts on other homes by Marmol Radziner:

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image: © Joe Fletcher; article: “Burton Residence / Marmol Radziner” 27 May 2013. ArchDaily

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Green Design, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture, Sustainable Architecture, Sustainable Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Enclave House by BKK Architects

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 30 January 2013

Enclave House by BKK Architects

Residential Architecture: Enclave House by BKK Architects: “..This project has been undertaken for a couple and their children of varying ages. (In Melbourne, Autralia), it includes alterations to an existing Edwardian House and a new separate studio to the rear of the site..The house is designed so that the spaces within and around the house will be adaptable over time to suit the changing needs of the family. The possibility for the studio space to be converted into an office has been considered as has the basement entertainment area conversion into a gym or multi-purpose play room. A central courtyard contains a pool and landscaped areas..The environmental initiatives for the project can be summarized as follows; •There is a 25,000lt underground rain water harvesting tank. •Double glazed windows throughout. •Highly insulated walls floors and roof. •Locally resourced, sustainable, plantation timber cladding. •Materials that are low-maintenance with inherent finishes. •Low-VOC materials. •Highly water efficient fixtures and fittings. •The existing residence has been retained and restored. •The planning and construction is designed to be highly adaptable..Formally, the extension at the rear of the existing residence is conceived through a subtractive approach that appears to have been carved from a solid block, chiseled away to cater to the planning/heritage overlays, whilst also drawing light back into the residence..Deep reveals form the windows to the upper floor to protect the gaze from the surrounding residences. An interior lightwell and water feature extend the garden space to the centre of the living spaces. The garden has also been carefully crafted to create its own secret garden, complete with designer cubby house. There is an overwhelming sense of seclusion in both the house and garden that creates a type of space that is the family’s own, a retreat from busy lives and the surrounding chaos..The fabric of the building/s operates like a protective cocoon. The differing materiality of the two levels of the extensions creates the impression that the house has been capped or that a ‘helmet’ is placed upon the exterior walls..”  Ample glazing, natural light; interesting form, materiality, interior volumes; sustainability..

See our post on another home by BKK Architects: Residential Architecture: Beached House by BKK Architects.

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image: © John Wheatley – UA Creative; article: “Enclave House / BKK Architects” 28 Jan 2013. ArchDaily.>

 

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture, Sustainable Architecture, Sustainable Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: S11 House by ArchiCentre

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 9 January 2013

S11 House by ArchiCentre

Residential Architecture: S11 House by ArchiCentre: “..The S11 house is located in an established older suburb of Petaling Jaya, Malaysia. The existing old house on the site was built in the early 1960’s and had become dilapidated and run-down over the years. A new green tropical house was planned for the site and conceptualized along the lines of a tree. The large tree canopy would cover and shelter the living spaces underneath it. The S11 House was designed to achieve the highest level Platinum rating of Malaysia’s Green Building Index (GBI)..There were five significant existing trees on the site. Three very old and sculptural frangipanis, a large star-fruit and a coconut palm tree. All these were retained and the new house was set in the midst of them. Much of the demolished old house materials were re-used. Old crushed concrete roof tiles for gravel fill, old clay bricks were cleaned and re-used for feature walls, roofing timbers were used for formwork strutting and propping, old steel were all sold off to steel yards, crushed concrete and cement aprons were re-used for backfilling aggregate..The S11 house has a clear north-south orientation for all its openings and windows. The east and west walls were deliberately void of any significant glazed openings and were constructed of better insulated aerated light weight concrete blocks. In addition they were coated in heat reflecting paint in camouflage motif and also shaded by a wire netting screen wall of fruit and vegetable climbers. These would help to reduce much of the heat gain through the east and west walls. The large tree-like canopy roof is constructed of lightweight recyclable profiled steel metal sheets coated in a light off-white colour to minimize heat absorption..The roof insulation comprises 200mm thick 50kg/m3 rockwool and two layers of heat reflective foil. A 200mm thick ventilated air space is left between the metal ceiling lining and the rockwool to further improve heat insulation. The overall roof U value is an impressive 0.14. The glazing comprises 9.38mm thick low-E safety laminated glass with a 90% openable area. The overall building envelope OTTV is 29.63..A specially designed wind turbine combined with a steel framed glazed pyramid provides the house with “stack effect” ventilation and light pipes. These 15 numbers of turbines are driven both by wind as well as convection when the air within the glass pyramids heat up as a result of the greenhouse effect. A 3 degree differential is enough to spin the turbines by convection. The large canopy roof is pitched at 5 degrees to facilitate self cleaning of roofing material and solar panels. A 5 KW peak photovoltaic installation is mounted unto the large canopy roof and the generated electricity is sold back into the national electric grid. The solar hot water heaters are also located on the large roof area..Rainwater collected on the canopy roof drains directly into the series of rainwater harvesting tanks. These are aligned in series for sedimentation control and the water from the last tank is used for all the toilet flushing, gardening and car washing requirements. All the tap fittings and sanitary wares have water saving and reduction valves..The majority of the house has bare natural finishes – raw off-form concrete walls and ceilings, cement plastered walls without paint and natural fair-faced common red clay brickwork. Stonework for bathrooms, driveway and Ground Floor living areas all come from project rejects. The timber flooring and upper decks are all Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified whilst the ground floor decking timbers are old recycled chengal collected over many years. Limited surfaces are painted with Low VOC paints. All internal joinery work has low VOC content and also water based glues. The 1m X 1m modular book shelves are all made from recycled waste plywood off-cuts with low VOC coatings and water based glues. The modules are stackable and can be relocated with ease in the boot of a car..The double volume Family room is located on the first floor and the 7m high full sliding glass walls facilitate maximum cross ventilation whilst also opening up the entire internal living space unto the outdoor deck. Lighting for the house are predominantly energy saving T5 tubes, LEDs and compact fluorescents. The house has full home office capability with Cat5 fibre-optics and broadband connections. The swimming pool and koi pond are located at the two extreme north-south ends and provide evaporative cooling for the house. Blackwater is treated in the onsite sewerage treatment plant and the recycled water is used for garden irrigation. A composting yard treats all the household organic and garden wastes and provides high grade compost fertilizer for the vegetable and fruit gardens. All new trees and plants are tropical natives that are generally maintenance free and suitable for the Malaysian climate..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, ventilation; interesting materiality, details, interior volumes and contextual sensibility; extensive green design inspiration, conception and details..

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image: © Lin Ho;article: “S11 House / ArchiCentre” 02 Jan 2013. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/313041&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Green Design, Interiors, lighting, Residential Architecture, Solar Design, Sustainable Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Green Houses by Sander Architects

Posted by the editors on Friday, 10 August 2012

Residential Architecture: Green Houses by Sander Architects: “..A pair of townhouses that face one another over a drivable courtyard, these two houses are like siblings—related but not identical. They both have three floors with double height living spaces that create visual drama. We have used bus graphics for the glass walls that face each other in order to allow in light but retain privacy.  The graphics for these panels was developed from images that the owner shot and manipulated. The rest of the building skin is composed of a shade screen created by diagonal, 1” x 2” aluminum angles..The front house is on the street and so it orients outwards from the lot, with a double-height living room that is opens directly into the front garden. The garden has a Zen-like feeling with two large boulders set into gravel and a specimen tree. The kitchen, dining room and media area are on the second floor, with two bedrooms on the third floor..The rear house orients to an exterior garden on the rear of the house. The kitchen / dining room is on this level so that when the large sliders are open it creates an indoor/outdoor flow. A pair of two-story raw steel panels, custom-designed for the project, fold out from the wall to create a hood and sconce covers. The second floor living room, with its glass railing and glass walkway, overlooks the kitchen. Three bedrooms are on the third floor, each with its own full bath..Green materials and strategies include passive heating and cooling, natural daylighting, shade screens, bamboo flooring, high-performance glazing, kitchen cabinetry from FSC-certified wood, recycled glass countertops, low-flush toilets, low VOC paint, and more..”  Interesting screens, interior volumes, materiality; extensive glazing, natural light, privacy; distinct graphic sensibility; 30s to mid-century furnishings combined with a contemporary interior styling..

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image: © Sharon Risedorph;  article: “Green Houses / Sander Architects” 09 Aug 2012. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/261627&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Green Design, Interiors, Mid-Century Design, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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