Designalog

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Posts Tagged ‘Maryland’

* Residential Architecture: Tred Avon River House by Robert M. Gurney Architect

Posted by the editors on Friday, 31 May 2013

Tred Avon River House by Robert M Gurney Architect

Residential Architecture: Tred Avon River House by Robert M. Gurney Architect: “..Easton, Maryland (USA), located in Talbot County on Maryland’s eastern shore, was established in 1710. Easton remains largely agrarian, with numerous farms interspersed among the area’s many waterways..Diverging from several acres of cornfields, a one-quarter mile road lined with pine trees terminates at a diamond-shaped tract of land with breathtaking views of the Tred Avon River. Arising from the gravel drive and hedge-lined parking court, this new house is unveiled as three solid volumes, linked together with glass bridges, suspended above the landscape. The central, 36-foot high volume is mostly devoid of fenestration, punctuated only by the recessed 10-foot high entry door and narrow sidelights. The contrasting 12-foot high western volume contains a garage and additional service space, while the eastern volume, floating above grade, contains the primary living spaces..After entering the house and passing through one of the glass bridges, the transformation begins. Initially presented as solid and austere, the house unfolds into a 124-foot long living volume, light-filled and wrapped in glass with panoramic views of the river. A grid of steel columns modulates the space. Covered terraces extend the interior spaces, providing an abundance of outdoor living space with varying exposures and views. A screened porch provides an additional forum to experience views of the river, overlooking a swimming pool, located on axis to the main seating group..Along with a geothermal mechanical system, solar tubes, hydronic floor heating and a concrete floor slab to provide thermal mass, large overhangs above the terraces prevent heat gain and minimize dependence on fossil fuel. The entire house is elevated four feet above grade to protect against anticipated future flooding..The house is crisply detailed and minimally furnished to allow views of the picturesque site to provide the primary sensory experience. The house was designed as a vehicle to experience and enjoy the incredibly beautiful landscape, known as Diamond Point, seamlessly blending the river’s expansive vista with the space..”  Lovely site; extensive glazing, natural light, river views; interesting fenestration and framing, materiality (as always with Robert M. Gurney Architect), contextuality, volume sensibility, detailing..

See our posts on other residential work by award-winning Robert M. Gurney Architect:

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image: © Maxwell MacKenzie; article: “Tred Avon River House / Robert M. Gurney Architect” 29 May 2013. ArchDaily

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* Residential Architecture: Matryoshka House by David Jameson Architect

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 15 September 2012

Residential Architecture: Matryoshka House by David Jameson Architect: “..Located in Bethesda, Maryland, USA, this small house is organized as a series of volumes nested one inside another.  At the core of the volumes is a suspended meditation chamber..The suspended box acts as the physical and spiritual center of the project.  The internal energy of the meditation chamber is encapsulated within an open glowing frame. An alternating tread stair engages the participant to deliberately ascend the threshold to the meditation chamber..The meditation chamber is surrounded by a wooden container which encases the living areas of the house. This shell is in turn cradled by stucco walls serving as a protective layer and grounding the house to the earth. The in-between spaces of the nested volumes are strategically sliced to allow the sun to project lines of light within. By separating the three shells, the interstitial spaces allow light to become an architectural material that activates the interior..”  Interesting form, interior volumes, materiality and details; extensive glazing, natural light; developed materiality; horizontal wood cladding..

See some of our posts on other homes by David Jameson Architect:

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image: © Paul Warchol Photography; article: Minner , Kelly . “Matryoshka House / David Jameson Architect” 26 Dec 2010. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/99023&gt;

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* Residential Architecture: Glenbrook Residence by David Jameson Architect

Posted by the editors on Friday, 14 September 2012

Residential Architecture: Glenbrook Residence by David Jameson Architect: “..Shaped largely by the site, the Glenbrook Residence is conceptually a courtyard inserted between two heavy walls. Threading the walls through the treescape to create distinct yet connected structures allows the house to be divided spatially into the most public, most private and a living pavilion that can become either or both. The residual in-between spaces create outdoor rooms that engage the building..The public and private wings of the house make up the foundations of the design concept. They are thought of as being of the earth and are articulated through their materials and shape as heavy, static pieces. These wings define the bounds of the house and act as the backbone to support the various courtyards, upper roof canopies and the dynamic living pavilion that sits between..the living pavilion is conceived as the center-piece of the concept and glows like a crystal between the heavy wall elements of the house and contains the cooking, eating, and living spaces..Above each of the heavy wings floats a thin, folding roof canopy. More than a simple surface, this roof canopy is conceived as an entity where nothing is hidden and all six sides are exposed to view. The walls that contain the spaces beneath these canopies are made of glass to create the illusion of a floating roof and to blur the boundary between inside and outside. All of these elements adopt a language of angular, dynamic forms in order to be completely liberated from the solid elements of the house..”  Extensive glazing, abundant natural light, views; interesting interior volumes, impressive materiality and details..

See our posts on four other homes by David Jameson Architect:

image: © Paul Warchol Photography; article: Minner , Kelly . “Glenbrook Residence / David Jameson Architect” 27 Jan 2011. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/106677&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Studio Addition by Bohl Architects

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 11 July 2012

Residential Architecture: Studio Addition by Bohl Architects: “..A 1970′s ranch house designed by Y. Toshimoto, included a detached studio. Dark, uninviting and not capturing the view of a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay, the frame studio was removed. The new studio is built on top of the existing foundation and connected to the main house..The new fireplace is a ruinous form that flows inside to outside between two spectacular Japanese red maple trees. The steel frame supports a floating fir rafter, purlin, planked ceiling..The architectural goal of the room is to capture the view of the intimate mature garden, the intermediate view of the water, and the long distant view of the horizon..By manipulating these multiple scales, the studio addition successfully integrates with the existing building while  simultaneously proclaiming its independence..”  Extensive glazing, wood, stone; abundant natural light, views; contextual and material sensibility..

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image: © Ron Solomon; article: “Studio Addition / Bohl Architects” 04 Sep 2011. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/165941&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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