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Posts Tagged ‘Mountain Homes’

* Residential Architecture: Alpine Cabin by Scott & Scott Architects

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 29 May 2013

Alpine Cabin by Scott & Scott Architects

Residential Architecture: Alpine Cabin by Scott & Scott Architects: “..The partners of new Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, studio Scott & Scott Architects created this remote snowboarding cabin for their own use at the northern end of Vancouver Island..The Alpine Cabin by Susan and David Scott is lifted off the ground on six columns made of douglas fir tree trunks, which pierce through the rooms on both storeys..The exterior clad in cedar, intended to weather to the tone of the surrounding forest, and the interior finished in planed fir..”The construction approach was determined to avoid machine excavation, to withstand the annual snowfall, to resist the dominant winds and to build in a manner which elevates the building above the height of the accumulated snow on the ground,” say the architects..The majority of the ground floor is taken up by a combined living room and kitchen, but also includes a bathroom and sauna. Upstairs there are two bedrooms with a study in between..One corner of the ground floor is cut away to create a spacious porch where firewood and snowboarding equipment can be stored..The cabin is located in a community-operated alpine recreation area 1300 metres above sea level and is accessible by a gravel road for five months of the year, but otherwise equipment and supplies must be carried on a sledge to the site..The building is completely off-grid, heated by a wood-burning stove and using water that must be fetched from nearby and carried in..The architects built the project themselves with the help of friends. “The cabin was constructed out of a desire to directly design and build as a singular act, to work with the freedom one experiences when snowboarding, and in a manner which is centered in the adventure and not bound heavily in pre-determination,” they explain..’  Lovely site; contextual and materials sensibility..

image + article: Dezeen

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* Residential Architecture: House Renovation in Chamoson by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 23 February 2013

House Renovation in Chamoson by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

Residential Architecture: House Renovation in Chamoson by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes: “..originally erected in 1814 in the mountain town of chamoson, switzerland, the latest house renovation by swiss practice savioz fabrizzi architectes marks the last major structural modification on a dwelling that has evolved throughout the decades all the while holding onto its unique history. the thick stone masonry walls reflect the sturdy construction of the era, born of the same rock that famously defines the jagged backdrop. the deep stone envelope also provides a natural coat of insulation and thermal mass, shading the interior spaces in the summer with inset windows and benefiting from a large thermal mass in the winter. the renovation preserves the soul of the residential edifice by leaving the exterior in as much of its original form as possible, replacing the deteriorating wooden planks that wrap the attic with a contemporary concrete  shell that still matches the general color of the facade. the window wells also provide one of the first hints as to the updated interior, with thin cast frames that subtly provide structural support and match the contemporary needs of a smooth orthogonal language. new larger apertures are cut out of the walls with thermal glass placed flush against the outer facade to retain the memory of the replaced section. situated on a sloping site, the house is split into three levels, with an underpass signaling an original access way before the home was expanded to the third floor situated on the highest point of the property..the interior tells an entirely different story, updated with soft pristine concrete partitions and surfaces that playfully contrast with areas of the exposed rugged historical walls. light reflects off of the semi-polished exposed finishes highlighting the decisive touches of orange fixtures that add a lively dynamic. the rooftop serves as a base for the 23 square-meters of solar panels that throughout the year generate 35% of the needed heating energy. the result nests the contemporary home within a sort of primordial vessel at the base of the breathtaking mountains, expressing an agreeable union between the character of the past and the function of the future..”  Interesting renovation, fenestration, materiality..

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image: © thomas jantscher, courtesy of savioz fabrizzi architectes; article: Designboom

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture, Solar Design, Sustainable Architecture, Sustainable Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Chalet C7 by Nicolás del Río + Max Núñez

Posted by the editors on Friday, 2 November 2012

Residential Architecture: Chalet C7 by Nicolás del Río + Max Núñez: “..Chalet C7 is located in the Andes Mountains at 2900 meters from the Portillo Hotel and a few miles from Mount Aconcagua. The land is characterized by a steep and rocky topography which faces the Inca Lagoon and the “Tres Hermanos” peaks..The house is hidden in the slope in order to interfere as little as possible with the view of the lagoon..The interior has two levels. A base level, built with rocks taken from the same hill, protects from snow in the winter . This wall defines the first floor, anchoring the building to the ground; the bedrooms and private spaces of the house are located behind it. These areas, whose dimensions vary according to domestic needs, are open to the outside..Over the main floor is a second level completely open to the landscape and the northern lights. In this open-plan space the objects are organized in a flexible way. A robust structure of metal beams defines the tectonic quality of space and allows this open space. The exposure of the large beams, unusual in a domestic space, makes gravity visible..”  Amazing site; extensive glazing, natural light, nature views; exposed steel beams; interesting form and interiors..

See our post on another home by Nicolás del Río + Max Núñez: Residential Architecture: La Baronia House by Nicolás del Rio + Max Núñez.

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image: © Erieta Attali; article: Alarcon , Jonathan . “Chalet C7 / Nicolás del Río + Max Núñez” 28 Oct 2012. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/286357&gt;

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* Residential Architecture: Villa Solaire by JKA + FUGA

Posted by the editors on Monday, 15 October 2012

Residential Architecture: Villa Solaire by JKA + FUGA: “..Jérémie Koempgen Architecture together with FUGA, have redesigned a historical farmhouse in Morzine, France, so it can be used as a vacation rental..”  Traditional chalet exterior conceals a contemporary interior with extensive glazing, interesting fenestration, abundant light; interesting interior volumes and materials; exposed timber rafters and beams..

image: Julien Lanoo; article: Contemporist

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