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Posts Tagged ‘Open-Plan’

* Residential Architecture: Burton Residence by Marmol Radziner

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 1 June 2013

Burton Residence by Marmol Radziner

Residential Architecture: Burton Residence by Marmol Radziner: “..This vacation home is set on the crest of a grassy knoll on a 160-acre site in Mendocino County, California, USA. The goal was to preserve and enhance the natural beauty of the property by siting the retreat in a careful, simple, and unobtrusive manner. The 10-module home forms an L-shaped plan, framing views of a canopy of mature oak trees to the south and east..The road leading to the house climbs the hill and ends at the carport at the home’s west end. A set of concrete stairs lead up a gentle grade from the carport to the entry deck, which runs along the north side of the home. The main volume is oriented east to west and arranged in an open plan. The living room, kitchen, and dining room collectively open southward onto a covered patio with an outdoor fireplace and pool area. From the main volume, the master bedroom extends to the north, following the edge of the hilltop and ending in a private deck that takes in the morning light from the east..Long Valley Ranch utilizes a number of sustainable strategies and materials. Passive solar heating and cooling are achieved through use of concrete flooring, covered decks, and natural through breezes. A 17-kW solar array offsets the electricity usage of the house, and a tankless hot water heater provides on-demand water heating. Sustainable materials are used throughout, including recycled denim insulation and low-VOC paint..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, views; contextuality; sustainability..

See our posts on other homes by Marmol Radziner:

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image: © Joe Fletcher; article: “Burton Residence / Marmol Radziner” 27 May 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Green Design, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture, Sustainable Architecture, Sustainable Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Manor House Stables by AR Design Studio

Posted by the editors on Thursday, 25 April 2013

Manor House Stables by AR Design Studio

Residential Architecture: Manor House Stables by AR Design Studio: “..Friday April 5th 1946, on a beautifully clear Spring afternoon crowds cheered as the 25/1 racehorse, “Lovely Cottage”, strode triumphantly past the finishing post to be crowned winner of the Grand National, the UKs largest horse race. Trained by Tommy Rayson and ridden by Captain Robert Petre at the first true Aintree Grand National race since 1940, after the Second World War, and the last to take place on a Friday, which had been the tradition since 1876..That weekend “Lovely Cottage” returned home to the small village of Headbourne Worthy, Winchester, UK. He received a hero’s welcome before settling in for a well-earned rest in the stables at the Manor House where he was housed.   These stables, that were once beautiful and functioning have since remained unused and have fallen into a state of dilapidation. Fortunately, this Grade 2 listed stable block, steeped in poignant historical character and narrative was not forgotten. It has been transformed into an elegant and contemporary 3 bedroom family home by RIBA award winning architects ..Practice Director, Andy Ramus, discovered this piece of overlooked historical heritage while undertaking a large scale refurbishment at the Manor House and immediately recognised its potential. The team at AR could see past its existing rundown state. There was a clear potential to create a sophisticated, contemporary family home within the historical context of the building and the picturesque Hampshire countryside..The history and character of the Stable’s was very much a driving force in design and there is a firm belief at AR Design Studio that design constraints and restrictions can often create the most interesting solutions. The concept was to preserve the existing while making any new additions simple and pure in order to let the original character shine. This results in an innovative arrangement of spaces according to the Stable’s existing layout, in order to maintain many of the existing exposed timber interior walls. These were then cleaned, stripped back and refurbished to reveal an exquisite amount of detailing and craftsmanship..With the existing internal walls brought back to life, the next task was to turn the Stables into a home for the modern family and bring it into the present day. In order to respect the character of the property a clean, contemporary and neutral approach was taken to the rest of the renovation which juxtaposes perfectly with the original timber walls, allowing them to stand out as pieces of art against a beautifully simple contemporary backdrop. Many of the existing features were refurbished and re-purposed for use in the home environment; the original horse troughs were cleaned and converted for use as sink basins, the old horse ties act as towel rings in the bathrooms and original doors are preserved where possible to give a sense of real period character..The Stables benefits from 3 large double bedrooms, with 2 en suite rooms to accompany a spacious family bathroom. Being a single storey property with long continuous views, the layout was tailored and split between sleeping and living accommodation with a single constant circulation running through the entire building. The welcoming and spacious open-plan kitchen dining area is conveniently located at the heart of the home, leading into the light and roomy lounge which benefits from full height glazed doors that open out onto the sleepy village setting..The entire property is super insulated, and the heated polished concrete floor throughout provides a functional uniformity to the spaces as well as recounting the Stable’s agricultural history. New windows and roof lights fitted throughout give the whole place a warm, bright and clean feel; creating an excellent environment as a backdrop for a family home..The finished Stables is completely transformed from its existing dilapidated condition and is now a perfectly working family home, bursting with contemporary style juxtaposed against delightful period character..”  Lovely contemporary transformation; extensive glazing, natural light; contextual and historical sensibility; interesting interior volumes; exquisite details..

See our other posts on homes by AR Design Studio:

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image: © Martin Gardner; article: “Manor House Stables / AR Design Studio” 17 Apr 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Cultural Architecture, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, lighting, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Stacked Cabin by Johnsen Schmaling Architects

Posted by the editors on Thursday, 4 April 2013

Stacked Cabin by Johnsen Schmaling Architects

Residential Architecture: Stacked Cabin by Johnsen Schmaling Architects: “..This modest, 880 square-foot cabin for a young family sits at the end of an old logging road, its compact volume hugging the edge of a small clearing in a remote Wisconsin, US, forest..The tight budget required a rigorously simple structure.  In order to minimize the building’s footprint and take advantage of the sloped site, the horizontally organized components of a traditional cabin compound – typically an open-plan longhouse with communal living space, an outhouse, and a freestanding toolshed – were reconfigured and stacked vertically.  The bottom level, carved into the hill and accessible from the clearing, houses a small workshop, equipment storage, and a washroom, providing the infrastructural base for the living quarters above.  A wood-slatted entry door opens to stairs that lead up to the open living hall centered around a wood-burning stove and bracketed by a simple galley kitchen and a pair of small, open sleeping rooms..Floor-to-ceiling curtains on either end of the living hall can be moved or retracted, their undulating fabric and delicate texture adding a sensual dimension to the crisp interior palette.  Depending on their arrangement, the curtains can provide privacy for the sleeping rooms, open them up to the main living space, or screen the kitchen when not in use.  Large-scale lift-slide apertures along the sides of the living hall offer extensive views of the forest and direct access to an informal hillside terrace.  In the summer, the apertures become screened openings, virtually transforming the living hall into a covered outdoor room and facilitating a high degree of cross-ventilation that eliminates the need for mechanical conditioning.  A small study, originally conceived as another room adjacent to the living hall, was instead stacked on top of it, creating an intimate, elevated observatory with treetop views..The meticulously detailed project takes advantage of readily available materials used in the region’s farmstead architecture. On the outside, exposed concrete, cedar, anodized metal, and cementitious plaster all echo the muted, earthy hues of the surrounding forest and rock formations.  The material palette extends to the inside, where integrally colored polished concrete floors on the two main levels provide sufficiently durable surfaces against the periodic abuse from cross country skies, dogs, and muddy hiking boots.  Walls, ceilings, and built-in cabinets are painted white, lightening up the interiors during the long winter months and providing a quiet, neutral foreground against which nature’s complex and ever-changing tableau, carefully framed by the cabin’s large openings, can unfold..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, forest views; interesting interiors, warm, in contrast to the rather austere exterior; contextual sensibility..

See our posts on other homes by Johnsen Schmaling Architects:

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image: © John J. Macaulay; article: “Stacked Cabin / Johnsen Schmaling Architects” 01 Apr 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Awards, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Chalet C7 by Nicolás del Río + Max Núñez

Posted by the editors on Friday, 2 November 2012

Residential Architecture: Chalet C7 by Nicolás del Río + Max Núñez: “..Chalet C7 is located in the Andes Mountains at 2900 meters from the Portillo Hotel and a few miles from Mount Aconcagua. The land is characterized by a steep and rocky topography which faces the Inca Lagoon and the “Tres Hermanos” peaks..The house is hidden in the slope in order to interfere as little as possible with the view of the lagoon..The interior has two levels. A base level, built with rocks taken from the same hill, protects from snow in the winter . This wall defines the first floor, anchoring the building to the ground; the bedrooms and private spaces of the house are located behind it. These areas, whose dimensions vary according to domestic needs, are open to the outside..Over the main floor is a second level completely open to the landscape and the northern lights. In this open-plan space the objects are organized in a flexible way. A robust structure of metal beams defines the tectonic quality of space and allows this open space. The exposure of the large beams, unusual in a domestic space, makes gravity visible..”  Amazing site; extensive glazing, natural light, nature views; exposed steel beams; interesting form and interiors..

See our post on another home by Nicolás del Río + Max Núñez: Residential Architecture: La Baronia House by Nicolás del Rio + Max Núñez.

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image: © Erieta Attali; article: Alarcon , Jonathan . “Chalet C7 / Nicolás del Río + Max Núñez” 28 Oct 2012. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/286357&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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