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Posts Tagged ‘Pilotis’

* Residential Architecture: Alpine Cabin by Scott & Scott Architects

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 29 May 2013

Alpine Cabin by Scott & Scott Architects

Residential Architecture: Alpine Cabin by Scott & Scott Architects: “..The partners of new Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, studio Scott & Scott Architects created this remote snowboarding cabin for their own use at the northern end of Vancouver Island..The Alpine Cabin by Susan and David Scott is lifted off the ground on six columns made of douglas fir tree trunks, which pierce through the rooms on both storeys..The exterior clad in cedar, intended to weather to the tone of the surrounding forest, and the interior finished in planed fir..”The construction approach was determined to avoid machine excavation, to withstand the annual snowfall, to resist the dominant winds and to build in a manner which elevates the building above the height of the accumulated snow on the ground,” say the architects..The majority of the ground floor is taken up by a combined living room and kitchen, but also includes a bathroom and sauna. Upstairs there are two bedrooms with a study in between..One corner of the ground floor is cut away to create a spacious porch where firewood and snowboarding equipment can be stored..The cabin is located in a community-operated alpine recreation area 1300 metres above sea level and is accessible by a gravel road for five months of the year, but otherwise equipment and supplies must be carried on a sledge to the site..The building is completely off-grid, heated by a wood-burning stove and using water that must be fetched from nearby and carried in..The architects built the project themselves with the help of friends. “The cabin was constructed out of a desire to directly design and build as a singular act, to work with the freedom one experiences when snowboarding, and in a manner which is centered in the adventure and not bound heavily in pre-determination,” they explain..’  Lovely site; contextual and materials sensibility..

image + article: Dezeen

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* Residential Architecture: BIG & small House by Anonymous Architects

Posted by the editors on Monday, 25 February 2013

BIG & small House by Anonymous Architects

Residential Architecture:  BIG & small House by Anonymous Architects: “..This tiny house in northeast Los Angeles, California, USA, by local studio Anonymous Architects contains only three rooms and is lifted off the hillside on a set of concrete pilotis..Named BIG & small House, the two-storey residence was designed to maximise space, as it occupies a plot around half the size of its neighbours..Rather than squeeze in lots of small rooms, Anonymous Architects chose to add just one large living room, a single bathroom and a mezzanine bedroom. “What the house lacks in square footage it provides in volume,” explains the architect..A single-car parking garage runs along the side of the house, and the mezzanine bedroom stretches out over the top, allowing the combined living and dining room to become a double-height space..To increase natural light inside the house, interior partions don’t meet the ceiling. This was intended to create an “open-lofted feeling”..The shape of the house is defined by the outline of its sloping site. The base of the building barely touches the declining ground, but is held firmly in place by concrete-pile foundations..”The house is a completely isolated object,” (says) architect Simon Storey.. “It’s almost like a industrial shed compared to it’s neighbours, however the undulating roof softens the house just enough that it feels part of the neighborhood.”..Seamed metal sheets clad the entire exterior, while interior walls and floors are lined with timber..Anonymous Architects previously worked on another house on a small plot in Los Angeles and named it Eel’s Nest after the narrow residences found in Japanese cities..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, views; small footprint; interesting details and interior volumes..

See our post on another home by Anonymous Architects: Residential Architecture: Eels Nest House by Anonymous Architects.

image + article: Dezeen

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* Residential Architecture: The Curving House by JOHO Architecture

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 10 February 2013

The Curving House by JOHO Architecture

Residential Architecture: The Curving House by JOHO Architecture: “..There is no home for parking: I remember that it was a winter day after snowing when I first visited the site. It was a rare residential lot with an open view to the south at the dead end of a small path beneath Mt. Gwanggyo, Korea. What was unique about this lot was that it was very hard to turn the car to come out of the path after more than 2 cars parked, because it was a small path only 4 m in width.  Ironically, the fundamental challenge was not only solving the parking problem but also creating a space for both parking and gardening to coexist. It was closely related to the lifestyle of home owner to decide whether to create a garden directly accessible from the living room or to emphasize a visual garden. To resolve this issue, the overall shape was formed to encase the lot with more curves and lifted about 2 m from the ground using pilotis for more efficient parking.  The shape of the mass resembling a concave lens was created by the parking needs and the topographical condition of the lot..The line penetrates the sky: The mountains penetrate the sky and the sky contains the mountains as nature. Here, the mountains form lines and the lines remember the mountains in the land. The terrains of Mt. Gwanggyo flow low above the lot and the lot displays the entire view as if it responds to the graceful flow. At this site, the land is the proof of space and everything about the substance. The shape created here contains the sky as an earthenware jar and displays the potentiality of land as a spatial substance. It draws a shape, but creates a space that shows the sky outside the shape to hide itself in nature. Should the line be hidden in nature or should the nature be displayed in the hidden line? This was the essential challenge of this land and the sincere response to the background. This is directly related to how the topographies should be interpreted in Korean traditional spaces. Korean traditional spaces have pursued the shape that is not completely hidden in nature yet beautifully harmonized with surrounding nature. It is based on the post-dualistic beauty of harmony that proves its existence while hiding in nature rather than dominating nature with its shape and lines..The flow of light contained in silver scale: The ash-colored bricks (traditional bricks) embrace the concrete surface as fish scale while slightly altering the angles. The traditional bricks used for this project have silver water-repellent coating on the surface and show sentimentality different from the rough surfaces of their tops and bottoms. The bricks with two different surfaces were piled to form a certain pattern from angles 1° through 25°. In other words, the variation of angle is another way how the outer skin in the shape of a concave lens facing south defines its existence. The shadow of the brick wall caste as the Sun moves converts the flow of lines into the subtle change of the outer skin. The variation of the brick surface is intended to read the entire mass differently according to the perspective of incomer and the perspective of viewing the images from the mountains..Contrast and harmony of texture: The rough texture of the traditional bricks interprets the lot in a different way in combination with the property of highly reflective stainless steel. The skies and nature reflected on the stainless steel surface distort what the true substance is to break the boundaries between shapes and texture. Unlike the rough texture of ceramic bricks, the stainless steel used on the front and on the side reflects the surrounding landscapes to make itself disappear. If the bricks reveal themselves by the change of light and shadow, the stainless steel de-materializes itself by making itself disappear in nature. Such contrasting textures have different properties and confront each other in a single mass, but they ultimately establish balance through the extinction and reflection of light..Space as a flow of nature: The pilotis for parking naturally serves as an opening for air ventilation. The summer breeze coming down from the mountain ridge circulates the air around the building thus reducing the heat load. Also, each room has windows for cross-ventilation and is planned to allow natural circulation of air. The motorized window on top of the living room can release heated air in summer for air circulation triggered by the difference in temperature known as stack effect. The staircase to the north is planned to serve as a buffer of air against the freezing northwestern winds in winter to minimize heat loss. The front windows facing the south allow sufficient sunlight in winter to maximize energy efficiency with natural sunlight. In particular, the ceiling is also diversified to invite as much natural light as possible into the building to control illumination naturally..New technical interpretation of traditional space: The flow of space was borrowed from the method of handling the flow of air in traditional Korean homes. In detail, the pilotis on the bottom expands the surface of volume exposed to outer air to reduce the load of heat energy and allows natural ventilation in summer. This is similar to the principle of open living rooms in Korean traditional spaces. It means that the entire building allows ventilation to keep the building cool. In winter, on the other hand, the concrete floor is made as thick as possible as a thermal mass, similar to Ondol floors of Korean traditional architecture for maximum insulation, to block the cold air from the underground. Also, the interior space of the second floor has an open living room, bedroom, and kitchen which can be divided and combined flexibly with sliding doors for different needs. This is a modern reinterpretation of the variable space of Korean traditional homes that can be used either as a big room or as smaller individual rooms..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, views; interesting form, exterior materiality, interior volumes, fenestration, contextuality..

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image: © Sun Namgoong; article: “The Curving House / JOHO Architecture” 06 Feb 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Pangal Cabin by EMa Arquitectos

Posted by the editors on Friday, 16 November 2012

Residential Architecture: Pangal Cabin by EMa Arquitectos: “..The house is located on the top of a slope site of 5000 sq. meters, characterize by local trees like Quillayes, Cactus and Espinos. The principal views points to the valley and ravines oriented to the north..The assignment was to generate a refuge, efficient and simple, from the beginning of the construction process to his after use. The requirements to generate the project are basically the access, the implant of the house, the terrace and the pool, that were condicionated by the local vegetation of the place, trying not to intervene the natural field. For these reason the house was design in pilotis and a 40 meters gangway that connect the access with the house. Spatially, it must take advantage of the existing views, incorporating natural light and solar energy, without losing his privacy and sense of reception..The house is divided in two areas maintaining spacial continuous, using the Quillay tree as a reference of the site to design the house. That is why the social and services spaces where situated in a higher volume, orientating views through the north-est, and the dormitory was located in a smaller space oriented to the north for more privacy..The structure is made of steel, chosen because of its faster construction and versatility.. Coverings are made of wood, we used horizontal tongue and groove joint with dark tint for exteriors and plywood treated on albayalde for interiors. In both cases the idea was to generate an economic solution, natural and neutral condition, in response to the exterior and interior space. To improve the thermic comfort we use projected polyurethane insulation according to the climate of the place..The pool of 2 x 10 and 1.2 meters deep was implanted according to the natural characteristics of the site. It communicates through the terraces with housing and corresponds to an extension of it. The roofs of both volumes are the fifth facade for multiplying situations, routes and views in contrast to the small dimension house..The whole North West facade views are focus to the valley framing the view in one unique space. This makes you to be part of the environment from the interior of the house. Our objective was to develop a home friendly place and away from pretensions..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, views; interesting materiality, interior volumes and details..

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image: © Marcelo Cáceres; article: Cifuentes , Fabian . “Pangal Cabin / EMa Arquitectos” 13 Nov 2012. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/293085&gt;

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