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Posts Tagged ‘rainwater harvesting system’

* Residential Architecture: Tucson Mountain Retreat by DUST

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 12 May 2013

Tucson Mountain Retreat by DUST

Residential Architecture: Tucson Mountain Retreat by DUST: “..The Tucson Mountain Retreat is located within the Sonoran Desert (Tucson, Arizona, USA); an extremely lush, exposed, arid expanse of land that emits a sense of stillness and permanency, and holds mysteries of magical proportions.  The home is carefully sited in response to the adjacent arroyos, rock out-croppings, ancient cacti, animal migration paths, air movement, sun exposure and views.  Great effort was invested to minimize the physical impact of the home in such a fragile environment, while at the same time attempting to create a place that would serve as a backdrop to life and strengthen the sacred connections to the awe-inspiring mystical landscape..Intentionally isolating the parking over 400 feet from the house, one must traverse and engage the desert by walking along a narrow footpath toward the house, passing through a dense clustered area of cacti and Palo Verde that obscure direct views of the home  Upon each progressive footstep, the house slowly reveals itself, rising out of the ground. The entry sequence, a series of playfully engaging concrete steps, dissolves into the desert. As one ascends, each step offers an alternative decision and a new adventure. Through this process, movement slows and senses are stimulated, leaving the rush of city life behind.  The home is primarily made of Rammed Earth, a material that uses widely available soil, provides desirable thermal mass and has virtually no adverse environmental side effects. Historically vernacular to arid regions, it fits well within the Sonoran Desert, while at the same time it embodies inherent poetic qualities that engage the visual, tactile and auditory senses of all who experience it..The program of the home is divided into three distinct and isolated zones; living, sleeping, and music recording/home entertainment.  Each zone must be accessed by leaving the occupied zone, stepping outside, and entering a different space.  This separation resolves the clients’ desired acoustic separation while at the same time, offers a unique opportunity to continuously experience the raw desert landscape..Rooted in the desert, where water is always scarce, the design incorporates a generous 30,000 gallon rainwater harvesting system with an advanced filtration system that makes our most precious resource available for all household uses..”  Lovely site; extensive glazing, natural light, views; interesting form, materiality; contextual sensibility..

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image: © Jeff Goldberg/Esto; article: “Tucson Mountain Retreat / DUST” 08 May 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Green Design, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture, Sustainable Architecture, Sustainable Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: S11 House by ArchiCentre

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 9 January 2013

S11 House by ArchiCentre

Residential Architecture: S11 House by ArchiCentre: “..The S11 house is located in an established older suburb of Petaling Jaya, Malaysia. The existing old house on the site was built in the early 1960’s and had become dilapidated and run-down over the years. A new green tropical house was planned for the site and conceptualized along the lines of a tree. The large tree canopy would cover and shelter the living spaces underneath it. The S11 House was designed to achieve the highest level Platinum rating of Malaysia’s Green Building Index (GBI)..There were five significant existing trees on the site. Three very old and sculptural frangipanis, a large star-fruit and a coconut palm tree. All these were retained and the new house was set in the midst of them. Much of the demolished old house materials were re-used. Old crushed concrete roof tiles for gravel fill, old clay bricks were cleaned and re-used for feature walls, roofing timbers were used for formwork strutting and propping, old steel were all sold off to steel yards, crushed concrete and cement aprons were re-used for backfilling aggregate..The S11 house has a clear north-south orientation for all its openings and windows. The east and west walls were deliberately void of any significant glazed openings and were constructed of better insulated aerated light weight concrete blocks. In addition they were coated in heat reflecting paint in camouflage motif and also shaded by a wire netting screen wall of fruit and vegetable climbers. These would help to reduce much of the heat gain through the east and west walls. The large tree-like canopy roof is constructed of lightweight recyclable profiled steel metal sheets coated in a light off-white colour to minimize heat absorption..The roof insulation comprises 200mm thick 50kg/m3 rockwool and two layers of heat reflective foil. A 200mm thick ventilated air space is left between the metal ceiling lining and the rockwool to further improve heat insulation. The overall roof U value is an impressive 0.14. The glazing comprises 9.38mm thick low-E safety laminated glass with a 90% openable area. The overall building envelope OTTV is 29.63..A specially designed wind turbine combined with a steel framed glazed pyramid provides the house with “stack effect” ventilation and light pipes. These 15 numbers of turbines are driven both by wind as well as convection when the air within the glass pyramids heat up as a result of the greenhouse effect. A 3 degree differential is enough to spin the turbines by convection. The large canopy roof is pitched at 5 degrees to facilitate self cleaning of roofing material and solar panels. A 5 KW peak photovoltaic installation is mounted unto the large canopy roof and the generated electricity is sold back into the national electric grid. The solar hot water heaters are also located on the large roof area..Rainwater collected on the canopy roof drains directly into the series of rainwater harvesting tanks. These are aligned in series for sedimentation control and the water from the last tank is used for all the toilet flushing, gardening and car washing requirements. All the tap fittings and sanitary wares have water saving and reduction valves..The majority of the house has bare natural finishes – raw off-form concrete walls and ceilings, cement plastered walls without paint and natural fair-faced common red clay brickwork. Stonework for bathrooms, driveway and Ground Floor living areas all come from project rejects. The timber flooring and upper decks are all Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified whilst the ground floor decking timbers are old recycled chengal collected over many years. Limited surfaces are painted with Low VOC paints. All internal joinery work has low VOC content and also water based glues. The 1m X 1m modular book shelves are all made from recycled waste plywood off-cuts with low VOC coatings and water based glues. The modules are stackable and can be relocated with ease in the boot of a car..The double volume Family room is located on the first floor and the 7m high full sliding glass walls facilitate maximum cross ventilation whilst also opening up the entire internal living space unto the outdoor deck. Lighting for the house are predominantly energy saving T5 tubes, LEDs and compact fluorescents. The house has full home office capability with Cat5 fibre-optics and broadband connections. The swimming pool and koi pond are located at the two extreme north-south ends and provide evaporative cooling for the house. Blackwater is treated in the onsite sewerage treatment plant and the recycled water is used for garden irrigation. A composting yard treats all the household organic and garden wastes and provides high grade compost fertilizer for the vegetable and fruit gardens. All new trees and plants are tropical natives that are generally maintenance free and suitable for the Malaysian climate..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, ventilation; interesting materiality, details, interior volumes and contextual sensibility; extensive green design inspiration, conception and details..

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image: © Lin Ho;article: “S11 House / ArchiCentre” 02 Jan 2013. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/313041&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Green Design, Interiors, lighting, Residential Architecture, Solar Design, Sustainable Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Slip House by Carl Turner Architects

Posted by the editors on Monday, 3 December 2012

Slip House by Carl Turner Architects

Residential Architecture: Slip House by Carl Turner Architects: “..Occupying one of four plots forming a gap in a typical Brixton, London, England, terrace, Slip House constitutes a new prototype for adaptable terraced housing. Three simple ‘slipped’ orthogonal box forms break up the bulk of the building and give it it’s striking sculptural quality..The top floor is clad in milky, translucent glass planks, which continue past the roof deck to create a high level ‘sky garden’. Designed to Code for Sustainable Homes Level 5, it features ‘energy piles’ utilising  a solar assisted ground source heat pump creating a thermal store beneath the building. PV’s, a wildflower roof, rain water harvesting, reduced water consumption, mechanical ventilation with heat recovery within an airtight envelope with massive levels of insulation make this one of the most energy efficient houses built in the UK. A prototype brownfield development offering dense, flexible, urban living – the house is a vehicle for in-house research into sustainable design, seamlessly integrating the often conflicting aesthetic requirements of architecture and alternative low energy systems. We are working to develop this model for multiple developments and as affordable housing..Living and working (‘Living over the shop’) is something that really interests us.  We see a prototype new ‘terraced’ house, squeezed into under-utilised city (Brownfield) sites. This flexible type of home can allow for the artisan or home-worker to sub-let or downsize.  This can enliven local communities and produce ‘homes’ which create opportunities rather than be dormitories or financial assets. Slip House is flexible and can be used as a single home, studio workspace and apartment, or two apartments..The perimeter walls are load bearing, freeing up the internal areas of supporting columns or additional load bearing walls. The house’s open-plan layout ensures that walls / dividers are simple to erect and require minimal construction effort. This aspect of Slip House is not only financially sustainable but also environmentally so, as it helps to ensure the permanence of the overall structure, as minimal modifications can allow the house to adapt to changing lives and living situations indefinitely..Our approach was to model the building as a series of simple orthogonal box forms that use the full width of the site. This allows future buildings to simply adjoin the flank walls..The house takes the idea of three slipped boxes. The boxes are carefully placed to maximise light and outlook from inside while not intruding on neighbour’s outlook. The shifting planes also break up the bulk of the building and give it its sculptural quality..”  Interesting form and flexibility; ample glazing, natural light; sustainability..

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image: © Tim Crocker; article: “Slip House / Carl Turner Architects” 30 Nov 2012. ArchDaily.  <http://www.archdaily.com/300175&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Green Concept Home by Modus V Studio Architects

Posted by the editors on Monday, 2 July 2012

Residential Architecture: Green Concept Home by Modus V Studio Architects: “..The “Green Concept Home” is a two-story single-family residence located in Bellevue, Washington..The project aims to build an environmentally friendly and sustainable home that moves our society towards more sustainable living. The house implemented many concepts of green designs – including structural insulated panels (SIPs), rainwater harvesting system, solar hot water heater, tankless hot water heater, heat recovery ventilator, radiant floor heating, solar orientation, Energy Star appliances, Energy Star metal roof, Energy Star windows, low-flow water fixtures, no VOCs paints, renewable and environmentally friendly materials and drought-tolerant landscaping. Our goal is to minimize energy and water usage, maximize the comfort for the residents and to create a holistic and sustainable way of life..Special care was also taken during construction to minimize waste and to recycle majority of the waste. The waste was sent to a local recycling facility with a 95%+ diversion rate..Throughout the project’s preparation, we have done intensive research and cost comparison, striving to make going green as affordable as possible without sacrificing functionality, comfort and style..Another goal of this project is about sharing information and lessons we have learned. Throughout our research, design, preparation and construction, we have documented information collected and lessons learned on our project website http://www.greenconcepthome.com. We have also arranged free educational public tours during construction. By doing so, we hope to increase public awareness on green building..”  Commendable intentions..

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image: © Millie Leung; “Green Concept Home / Modus V Studio Architects” 16 May 2011. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/135212&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Green Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture, Sustainable Architecture, Sustainable Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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