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Posts Tagged ‘Renovations’

* Residential Architecture: Green Box by act_romegialli

Posted by the editors on Tuesday, 28 May 2013

Green Box by act_romegialli

Residential Architecture: Green Box by act_romegialli: “..This glazed garden hideaway in Italy by Italian studio act_romegialli is disguised inside a dense thicket of bushy plants and blossoming wildflowers..The little building previously functioned as a garage for a weekend retreat in the Raethian Alps, but act_romegialli was asked to convert it into a space where the owner can keep gardening tools, prepare meals and entertain guests..Retaining the rustic stone walls and columns of the old garage, the architects installed a galvanised metal framework with a skeletal pitched roof, then added glazed panels to infill openings on each of the walls..Steel wires strung up around the structure help a selection of deciduous plants to climb over the facade, plus a mixture of annual and perennial shrubs are planted around its base, providing a constant blanket of exterior greenery..The interior of the building is divided into two rooms, both with weather-beaten larch floors and exposed concrete ceilings. The kitchen is constructed from galvanised steel and features a sink with metal pipes for taps..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, garden views; lovely garden pavilion; original article features a five-image slideshow and many additional images..

image: Marcello Mariana; article: Dezeen

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Green Design, Interior Design, Interiors, Landscape Architecture, Residential Architecture, Slide Shows, Sustainable Architecture, Sustainable Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: The Glass House by AR Design Studio

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 18 May 2013

The Glass House by AR Design Studio

Residential Architecture: The Glass House by AR Design Studio: “..AR Design Studio have completed a glass extension on a house in Winchester, England, UK..it is not every day that a body is found buried on your building site, but on a summer’s morning in 2012 this is exactly what happened while builders were laying foundations for RIBA award-winning architects AR Design Studio’s latest project. By 6pm they had found another 2..After the initial astonishment, the Police and later a team of Archaeologists were brought in who thankfully identified the remains as being of Roman origin. After a period of intense excavation, it was confirmed as a site of Archaeological importance when further evidence of Roman burials and defensive fortifications were uncovered, including the discovery of a rare Roman burial urn. Once the site was cleared of artefacts and the bodies taken to the local museum for research, work on the building could continue..These ancient findings further added to the already rich historical context of the property situated in the town of Winchester, the old Roman capital of England. The project was to convert the original servants’ quarters of the large Manor House that overlooked the surrounding grasslands. It was built by the Earl of Airlie in 1856 while he served as Camp Commandant at the nearby Peninsular Barracks military base and split into two more modestly sized dwellings in the 1950s..Since then, the servants’ quarters had fallen into a state of disrepair after the unfortunate passing of a sole elderly owner. It remained vacant for a number of years, until the long-time occupants of the Manor House sought to retire and move into the more manageable servants’ quarters and turn it into their dream home..The owner’s love of glass fuelled their brief to construct a beautifully simple sculptural glass staircase and a contemporary glass extension, situated at the rear of the property in the space created by the ‘C’ shape of the building, which would open itself up to the garden..The couple approached AR Design Studio Chartered Architects because of their experience in dealing with glass architecture and their interest in how this material can be used to create seamless relationships between inside and outside space, between the man-made and nature..Hidden from view behind the buildings traditional façade, the finished extension is an elegant piece of modern contemporary glass architecture. It completely reinvents the feel and atmosphere of the previously dark and cramped servants’ quarters; all within the rich and poignant historical context of the site..The concept was to provide a clean and light architectural intervention alongside the traditional shell of the building which would positively affect the feel and functionality of the property. The spaces are designed to accentuate a play between light and dark; contrasting from the bright and open communal spaces to the more subtle and secluded, almost cave-like retreat spaces in the old house. The existing layout was clarified; vertical voids were cut through the house to unite the cellar, ground and first floors and redirect the flow of the house to naturally draw the user towards the new glass space at the heart of the home..This extremely light and spacious frameless glass extension houses the open-plan kitchen, living and dining areas. As the delicate structure reaches over to form the walls and roof of the extension, it creates a flexible inside/outside space allowing sunlight to flood through the home and filter down gradually, creating beautiful shards of light and shadow..As a contrast to the extension, the formal lounge, study and dining room have a more sheltered and embracing nature. Upstairs, the Glass House has 4 large double bedrooms, each with an en-suite bathroom. The master suite has its own walk-in wardrobe and views overlooking the garden and the top of the glass extension below. All the essentials have been accounted for, in the form of utility and laundry rooms, study and WC that flank the glass box..The strategic placement of the large roof light floods the entrance hall with sunlight that tracks through the double-height space with the time of day and the seasons. Timber ceramic tiling was used as an innovative alternative to traditional timber flooring because it does not discolour in the weather and is a perfect surface to compliment the underfloor heating throughout. This allowed for a seamless floor finish running from the inside to the outside onto the cantilevered patio..The rest of the house is finished to a minimal and clean appearance to allow the functional glass structures to stand out as exquisite pieces of sculptural art in their own right..Whilst still retaining a subtle street appearance, the finished property now renamed Clarkes, is completely transformed from its previous gloomy and decrepit nature. The modern renovation and extension creates a light, airy and open living environment bursting with traditional values, contemporary style and innovative design..”  Extensive glazing, naturally enough, and abundant natural light, garden views; interesting renovation and addition to an existing structure..

See our posts on three other homes by AR Design Studio:

image: Martin Gardner; article: Contemporist

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Awards, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Kerry House by Carson and Crushell Architects

Posted by the editors on Thursday, 16 May 2013

Kerry House by Carson and Crushell Architects

Residential Architecture: Kerry House by Carson and Crushell Architects: “..This project is a major reworking of a dilapidated 1960′s bungalow overlooking Kenmare River, Kenmare, Ireland. The structure was wrapped in a thick insulated render lining with high performance glazing fitted flush into existing and newly made openings. All internal rooms were reorganised, improving relationships between the bedrooms and their new en-suites and the relocated kitchen, dining room and central courtyard. In addition, a terrace and long bench of Kilkenny limestone were made to extend the living spaces into the landscape..”  Extensive glazing, natural light; interesting contemporary renovation and reworking of an existing structure..

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image: Courtesy of Carson and Crushell Architects; article: “Kerry House / Carson and Crushell Architects” 12 May 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Smith-Clementi Residence by Rios Clementi Hale Studios

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 5 May 2013

Smith-Clementi Residence by Rios Clementi Hale Studios

Residential Architecture: Smith-Clementi Residence by Rios Clementi Hale Studios: “..ProgramExterior and interior remodel and addition to single-family home and adjacent yard. First floor: living area, kitchen/breakfast room, powder room, outdoor dining, garage. Second floor: master suite, family room/office, two children’s bedrooms, children’s bath, utility room. Design: Originally built in 1920s (at 600 square feet) and renovated by husband-and-wife architects in 1996 with second-floor addition, the house grew again in 2012 with the addition of a second lot, reconfiguration of public and private areas, and new garage and master suite. The resulting home now revolves around indoor/outdoor connections to the vast patio space with decorative and working gardens. The front volume maintains a refined lap siding as a signal to the house’s bungalow origins with a scale appropriate for the walk street, while the expressive back volume sports exaggerated vertical wood framing as sunshades to the glass master bedroom volume. “A house and its antithesis,” is how the architects/homeowners describe the relationship between the two elements. The house slowly reveals itself along a walk street in Venice, California, with the design juxtapositions foreshadowed by corresponding fences—a vine-covered traditional wrought-iron fence leads into an raw- wood rustic picket fence. The idea of “Cape Cod meets California Modern” is displayed in the varying rooflines that open the structure to natural light and create terraces for outdoor living. Public areas on the ground floor flow into each other and toward the outdoors. A new large sliding-glass door opens the lower level out to the generous plaza formed from linear concrete slabs with grass and pebbles interspersed. No-mow grass surrounds the front elevated entry porch, which begins the consistent black concrete-tile flooring that travels from outside through the first-floor living, dining, and kitchen areas, then back outside to the al fresco dining platform. Muted colors on the exterior are derived from the landscape and majestic magnolia tree on the property, while natural-wood trim further connects the structure to the landscape. Accessible openings—doors and operable windows—are trimmed in olive paint. The back volume addition encompasses garage and storage with glass-enclosed master suite above. Structural, vertical raw-wood framing is expressively placed around the glass volume. In additional to functionally acting as sunscreens, the beams connote a tree house and correspond to the picket fence in both materiality and attitude. Both front and back parts of the house are distinct on the ground floor—connected by the open-air dining terrace—while the upper- level, cement-board cladded “bridge” connection is more seamless from the interior, acting as a large, common space shared by the family. Immediately upon entering the home, one feels the senses of light and play. Window walls face the outdoor areas and clerestory windows express the changing levels. Standing in the entry living room, one can see clear through to the breakfast area, outdoor dining, and garage. The living room features built-in and free-standing custom benches upholstered in lively patterned fabric. The existing fireplace was re-clad in origami-like dark metal. Materials were chosen to express functionality, thus natural wood and plywood are used extensively, allowing family art and artifacts to add color and character. The open kitchen features a built-in banquette and breakfast table, sleek and simple white cabinetry, and plywood- covered exhaust hood above the working antique stove, which once belonged to noted architect Ming Fung’s mother (Smith and Clementi met at Hodgetts + Fung early in their careers). The custom butcher- block island unfolds to a playful Buffalo profile. Floor-to-ceiling plywood book and entertainment center leads to the heavy timber wood staircase. Upstairs, two bedrooms and a shared bath for the owners’ nine- and 16-year-old daughters are separated from the master suite by the “bridge”. Central to the bridge is the open family room—a hub of activity combining TV viewing, computer, and various other functions that mirror the family’s lifestyle. The flooring changes from wood to cork tiles beyond an olive-colored floor-to-ceiling door that opens to the master suite, which includes seating area, terrace, bath, and walk-in closets. A seven-foot-high plywood wall acts as headboard and privacy shield to the alley, while the CMU wall extends up from the garage below and then through the full-height glass wall to the outdoor balcony. Sliding and pocketing doors on two sides can be opened and closed as desired to manage degrees of openness. The hanging fireplace swivels to direct heat either toward the room or toward the balcony. The plywood storage wall is inset with red doorways leading into closets and the master bath. Open shelves allow a clear view into the bath, which may alternately by closed off by sliding the door all the way across. White cabinetry and positive/negative faux bois tile highlight the master bath. Obtaining the neighboring lot gave the owners the freedom to open the home up to the outside. “Even though we’re Modernists,” notes Frank, “the relationship to the outdoors in the previous renovation wasn’t sufficient.” Orienting views toward the existing 80-year-old Magnolia Grande Flora tree resulted in short vistas with long diagonals that afford views, light, and air. On the adjoining property sits an olive-colored house for Julie’s mother, who also collaborated on the landscape. Long troughs with growing vegetable are placed along the walk street..” Interesting cladding / timber sun-screen, interior volumes and details; indoor / outdoor sensibility..

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image: © Undine Pröhl; article: “Smith-Clementi Residence / Rios Clementi Hale Studios” 01 May 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, lighting, Modernism, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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