Designalog

……….design diversity……….

Posts Tagged ‘Roof Terraces’

* Residential Architecture: Tower House by Gluck+

Posted by the editors on Thursday, 16 May 2013

Tower House by Gluck+

Residential Architecture:  Tower House by Gluck+: “..This holiday home in upstate New York, USA, by US firm Gluck+ features an elevated living room that hovers nine metres above the ground..As the weekend retreat for Thomas Gluck – one of the firm’s principals – and his family, Tower House was designed as a four-storey tower with a “treetop aerie”, affording mountain views across the nearby Catskill Park..The house is glazed on every side. In some places Gluck+ has fitted dark green panels behind to camouflage the walls with the surrounding woodland, while other areas remain transparent, revealing a bright yellow staircase that zigzags up behind the southern elevation..Taut vertical cables form the balustrade for this staircase and are interspersed with small lights, intended to look like fireflies after dark..One of the main aims of the design was to minimise the impact on the landscape. The architects achieved this by lifting the large living areas off the ground and stacking bedrooms and bathrooms on the three floors beneath, creating a base footprint of just 40 square metres..This arrangement also allows all of the wet rooms to be arranged in an insulated central core. When the house isn’t is use, this core isolates the heating systems, helping to reduce energy consumption..The three bedrooms are positioned on the north side of the house, where they can benefit from the most consistent daylight, and contain yellow furniture to match the colour of the staircase..The living room above is divided up into four different zones by the arrangement of furniture and features a 12-metre-long window seat that spans the entire space. There’s also a secluded roof terrace on the next level up..New York-based Gluck+ was known until recently as Peter Gluck and Partners. The firm is now run by Peter, his son Thomas, and three other principals..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, views; interesting cantilevered form, fenestration, furnishings.. Interesting photos and slideshow..

See our posts on two other home by Gluck+:

image: © Paul Warchol; article: Dezeen

designalog : contact

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture, Slide Shows | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Tucson Mountain Retreat by DUST

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 12 May 2013

Tucson Mountain Retreat by DUST

Residential Architecture: Tucson Mountain Retreat by DUST: “..The Tucson Mountain Retreat is located within the Sonoran Desert (Tucson, Arizona, USA); an extremely lush, exposed, arid expanse of land that emits a sense of stillness and permanency, and holds mysteries of magical proportions.  The home is carefully sited in response to the adjacent arroyos, rock out-croppings, ancient cacti, animal migration paths, air movement, sun exposure and views.  Great effort was invested to minimize the physical impact of the home in such a fragile environment, while at the same time attempting to create a place that would serve as a backdrop to life and strengthen the sacred connections to the awe-inspiring mystical landscape..Intentionally isolating the parking over 400 feet from the house, one must traverse and engage the desert by walking along a narrow footpath toward the house, passing through a dense clustered area of cacti and Palo Verde that obscure direct views of the home  Upon each progressive footstep, the house slowly reveals itself, rising out of the ground. The entry sequence, a series of playfully engaging concrete steps, dissolves into the desert. As one ascends, each step offers an alternative decision and a new adventure. Through this process, movement slows and senses are stimulated, leaving the rush of city life behind.  The home is primarily made of Rammed Earth, a material that uses widely available soil, provides desirable thermal mass and has virtually no adverse environmental side effects. Historically vernacular to arid regions, it fits well within the Sonoran Desert, while at the same time it embodies inherent poetic qualities that engage the visual, tactile and auditory senses of all who experience it..The program of the home is divided into three distinct and isolated zones; living, sleeping, and music recording/home entertainment.  Each zone must be accessed by leaving the occupied zone, stepping outside, and entering a different space.  This separation resolves the clients’ desired acoustic separation while at the same time, offers a unique opportunity to continuously experience the raw desert landscape..Rooted in the desert, where water is always scarce, the design incorporates a generous 30,000 gallon rainwater harvesting system with an advanced filtration system that makes our most precious resource available for all household uses..”  Lovely site; extensive glazing, natural light, views; interesting form, materiality; contextual sensibility..

designalog : contact

image: © Jeff Goldberg/Esto; article: “Tucson Mountain Retreat / DUST” 08 May 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Green Design, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture, Sustainable Architecture, Sustainable Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: 128G Cairnhill Road by RichardHO Architects

Posted by the editors on Friday, 26 April 2013

128G Cairnhill Road by RichardHO Architects

Residential Architecture: 128G Cairnhill Road by RichardHO Architects: “..Our initial survey of the property revealed the building’s good bones. The house’s original condition was quite good but its configuration did not suit modern living. A primary concern was that the kitchen and bathrooms were located at the back of the house, away from activities of the living and dining rooms and inappropriate for entertaining..We retained the building envelope and reconfigured the layout to create a single, seamless living-dining-kitchen volume, taking special care to maintain the hierarchy of space so central to the design of pre-war shop house. The resultant scheme is a distinctly modern take on a traditional shop house. It received an instant stamp of approval from the owners. “I love the fact that when you enter, you can see straight through the back, but know that the various areas are designed for specific purposes,” says the owner..To recreate the shop house essence, we redefined two characteristic features of shop house architecture – the skylight and the air well. To emphasise the importance of this space as the fulcrum of the house, we introduced a water feature and koi pond and made the staircase wind around this water feature. Where the air well was once exposed to the elements, it is now equipped with a retractable glass roof and independently operated blinds that reflect 75 percent of the heat back into the atmosphere, keeping the internal temperature comfortable. Depending on the extent to which the blinds are retracted, the time of the day and the intensity of the sun, the shaft of light streaming in casts shadows in varied patterns. On moonlit nights, the glass roof can be fully retracted to take in the view..The second storey has one wing housing the master bedroom and ensuite bathroom, and the other containing the nursery and daughter’s bedroom. We custom-designed and installed a series of child safety doors at strategic locations, which can be removed once the owner’s daughter comes of age. The master bedroom is a self contained volume reminiscent of a luxury hotel suite: a divider at the entrance doubles up as the bed’s headboard, while a bank of wardrobe in a high-gloss white finish lines walls on either side. The piece de resistance is the master bathroom, with its view of lush greenery that whisks one away from the hustle and bustle of city life..The guest room on the attic level functions as the owners study when there are no visitors. Here, an enormous 4m high glass door and glass wall are used in place of the usual timber and brick counterparts. We wanted to enhance the sense of space. If you open the door, air can flow through and ventilate the space. Our rationale resonated well with the client, who picked this as his favourite room in the house. The room is large with high ceilings and a real ‘loft’ feel. “Sitting at my desk, I can look down into the kitchen and my family room”, says the owner. A surprise awaits intrepid visitors who make the journey all the way up to the rooftop: an outdoor terrace with an infinity edge pool and a panorama of green, the same view shared by the master bathroom..This is one of the most contemporary shop houses we have done so far. But it has the unmistakable feel of a shop house, because we do not believe in creating space in a conserved house that do not have memories of its past. It would be like a person with amnesia. The owner agrees. “I love the clean feel and while the house is very modern, there is no question about its origins:, he says. Asked if the house suits his family’s needs, the owner replies, “Very much so. There are spaces we can do things as a family, and there are spaces we can do things separately. It is great for entertaining but also quite intimate at the same time.”..”   Extensive glazing, natural light, privacy, garden views; interesting interior volumes, details; historical, social and contextual sensibility..

designalog : contact

image: © Vineyard Production; article: “128G Cairnhill Road / RichardHO Architects” 17 Apr 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Caxinas House by AUZprojekt

Posted by the editors on Tuesday, 9 April 2013

Caxinas House by AUZprojekt

Residential Architecture: Caxinas House by AUZprojekt: “..portuguese practice AUZprojekt has just shared with us images of their newest renovation in the small fishing town of vila do conde, Portugal, in a very dense urban context. the narrow rectangular plot contains an internal courtyard towards the back end and dictates the type and use of vertical circulation so as not to intrude excessively in the limited width available. a wing along the back side of the main volume extends the living areas that open to the private patio and creates another terrace on its rooftop..”  Interesting interior volumes and details..

image: courtesy of AUZprojekt; article: Designboom

designalog : contact

Posted in Designalog, Architecture, Design, contemporary design, Interiors, Contemporary Architecture, Architects, Residential Architecture, Architecture + Design, Interior Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,836 other followers

%d bloggers like this: