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Posts Tagged ‘Slate’

* Residential Architecture: Tred Avon River House by Robert M. Gurney Architect

Posted by the editors on Friday, 31 May 2013

Tred Avon River House by Robert M Gurney Architect

Residential Architecture: Tred Avon River House by Robert M. Gurney Architect: “..Easton, Maryland (USA), located in Talbot County on Maryland’s eastern shore, was established in 1710. Easton remains largely agrarian, with numerous farms interspersed among the area’s many waterways..Diverging from several acres of cornfields, a one-quarter mile road lined with pine trees terminates at a diamond-shaped tract of land with breathtaking views of the Tred Avon River. Arising from the gravel drive and hedge-lined parking court, this new house is unveiled as three solid volumes, linked together with glass bridges, suspended above the landscape. The central, 36-foot high volume is mostly devoid of fenestration, punctuated only by the recessed 10-foot high entry door and narrow sidelights. The contrasting 12-foot high western volume contains a garage and additional service space, while the eastern volume, floating above grade, contains the primary living spaces..After entering the house and passing through one of the glass bridges, the transformation begins. Initially presented as solid and austere, the house unfolds into a 124-foot long living volume, light-filled and wrapped in glass with panoramic views of the river. A grid of steel columns modulates the space. Covered terraces extend the interior spaces, providing an abundance of outdoor living space with varying exposures and views. A screened porch provides an additional forum to experience views of the river, overlooking a swimming pool, located on axis to the main seating group..Along with a geothermal mechanical system, solar tubes, hydronic floor heating and a concrete floor slab to provide thermal mass, large overhangs above the terraces prevent heat gain and minimize dependence on fossil fuel. The entire house is elevated four feet above grade to protect against anticipated future flooding..The house is crisply detailed and minimally furnished to allow views of the picturesque site to provide the primary sensory experience. The house was designed as a vehicle to experience and enjoy the incredibly beautiful landscape, known as Diamond Point, seamlessly blending the river’s expansive vista with the space..”  Lovely site; extensive glazing, natural light, river views; interesting fenestration and framing, materiality (as always with Robert M. Gurney Architect), contextuality, volume sensibility, detailing..

See our posts on other residential work by award-winning Robert M. Gurney Architect:

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image: © Maxwell MacKenzie; article: “Tred Avon River House / Robert M. Gurney Architect” 29 May 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Awards, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Casa CorMAnca by Paul Cremoux Studio

Posted by the editors on Monday, 27 May 2013

Casa CorMAnca by Paul Cremoux Studio

Residential Architecture: Casa CorMAnca by Paul Cremoux Studio: “..This family house in Mexico City by local architect Paul Cremoux conceals a three-storey wall of plants behind its slate-clad facade..Concerned about the lack of sustainable construction in the country, Paul Cremoux Studio designed a building that uses plants to moderate its own internal temperature, whilst giving residents an indoor garden..”Making sustainable eco-effective design in Mexico is pretty hard. Many clients do not yet realise the importance of changing the design strategy,” says architect Paul Cremoux..He explains: “We would like to think about vegetation not only as a practical temperature-humidity comfort control device, or as a beautiful energetic view, but also as an element that acts like a light curtain.”..The green wall flanks a courtyard terrace, which occupies the middle floor and is open to the sky on one side. Meanwhile, most the rooms of the house are positioned on the levels above and below..A driveway for two cars is located beneath the terrace and leads through to the dining and kitchen areas. A living room and three bedrooms occupy the second floor and can be accessed via a staircase tucked away in the corner..The dark slate panels that clad the exterior also line some of the walls around the courtyard, contrasting with the light wood finishes applied elsewhere..”  Extensive glazing, natural light; magnificent green wall; interesting form, interior volumes, materiality; original article includes a four-image slideshow and many additional images..

See our post on another home by Paul Cremoux Studio: Residential Architecture: La Caracola Seashore House by Paul Cremoux Studio.

image: Héctor Armanado Herrera and PCW; article: Dezeen

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Green Design, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture, Slide Shows, Sustainable Architecture, Sustainable Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Eco-Resort Pedras Salgadas by Luís Rebelo de Andrade and Diogo Aguiar

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 9 December 2012

Eco-Resort Pedras Salgadas by Luís Rebelo de Andrade and Diogo Aguiar

Residential Architecture: Eco-Resort Pedras Salgadas by Luís Rebelo de Andrade and Diogo Aguiar: “..These seven woodland cabins are nestled amongst the trees of a park and spa in northern Portugal..Designed by Portuguese architects Luís Rebelo de Andrade and Diogo Aguiar, the huts offer a peaceful retreat for guests visiting the park, which is located on the edge of the spa-town of Pedras Salgadas, Portugal..“Knowing that we had a responsibility to build tourist accommodation in one of the most beautiful parks in the country, we took maximum care to have a minimal effect on the local nature,” Diogo Aguiar told Dezeen. “We chose to build small and dispersed huts rather than do a large concentrated building, promoting more intimate relationships between the visitor and the park.”..All seven cabins are raised up on stilts to negotiate the uneven terrain and to have a minimal impact on the ground. Each building also features walls clad with grey slate tiles and balconies surrounded with wooden slats..“The outer coating in slate tiles refers to the local construction traditions. It is very interesting because of its pixel texture but also because of the way it reacts to the weather; it reflects the sun in the evening and gets dark and shiny when it rains,” explained Aguiar..The buildings were designed as different combinations of three identical modules, which include a living room and kitchen, an entrance and bathroom, plus one bedroom..“Once on site, the perfect house configurations were chosen by considering the available space between the trees, the landscape views and the entrance location,” said Aguiar..”  Interesting form, interior volumes, fenestration; horizontal wood cladding; lovely site..

image: Fernando Guerra; article: Dezeen

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Hospitality Architecture, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Six Mile Lake Cottage by Altius Architecture Inc.

Posted by the editors on Friday, 26 October 2012

Residential Architecture: Six Mile Lake Cottage by Altius Architecture Inc.: “..The cottage replaces an old seasonal A-frame that was interesting but did not offer a  reasonable opportunity for expansion or upgrade for year round use. The structure was however, dismantled by hand in order to salvage the long Douglas Fir lumber. The site is very unique and represents a prime example of the exposed glacial-formed Canadian Shield that gives this area it’s unique identity. The building is sited to reuse the area previously occupied by the old cottage, in turn minimizing the new building’s impact on the site. The additional footprint and organization of the new dwelling is informed by the granite shelves offered by the site, each of the floor levels hugs the natural terrain. Upon arrival from land the building appears as a single story though once inside it’s larger volumes are revealed as the spaces step down towards the lake..Sustainability Features: Early in the design stage, after gaining an intimate understanding of the site, we made the effort to minimize the new building’s footprint beyond that of the existing A-frame. In keeping with our philosophy of site-specific design we let the uniqueness of the site drive the design. No blasting. The result is a building completely engaged with it’s site and one that couldn’t exist anywhere else. This is our first goal for a building that treads lightly..As we consider the natural siting, we also pay close attention to desired passive solar heat gain in the winter and passive solar shading, natural ventilation for the summer. Design first, Technology second. Here, as with every project, we do as much as we can with the design of the building, before making up the difference with the most economically sensible system..”  Interesting form, materiality and interior volumes; extensive glazing, natural light, nature views; lovely site..

See our posts on two other homes by Altius Architecture Inc.:

image: © Ihor Pona; article: Arthitectural

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

 
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