Designalog

……….design diversity……….

Posts Tagged ‘Stone’

* Residential Architecture: House in Monasterios by Ramon Esteve

Posted by the editors on Friday, 17 May 2013

House in Monasterios by Ramon Esteve

Residential Architecture: House in Monasterios by Ramon Esteve: “..The house is located in an elevated area, from which it dominates a hillside leading down to the sea. This view marks the direction the walls will take and, in an abstract form, define the project. The house is structured as a compaction of volumes of varying heights, and the form established by the main walls..The articulating space volume of this sequence is obtained from opening courts and patios in the central space of the house. A series of open courtyards are formed, covered in its perimeter like an atrium, in search of the access to the house, obtaining different perceptions of the house..The views from any point intersect and are never interrupted along the permeable sequence at the end of which, limited between glass membranes, is the lobby. Thus, it creates an approach path that exposes the more intimate side of the house so that, once inside, you discover the long views over the hillside to the sea..Among the great defining walls, the space is closed with large glass panels protected with wooden movable planes, graduating the closing level of each piece..The housing program is focused very clearly in the direction marked by the walls, and volumes depend on the spatial hierarchy of spaces. Two wooden emerging volumes, materialized by the chimneys, mark the counterpoint to the horizontality that defines the entire house..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, views; interesting fenestration, interior details and materiality..

designalog : contact

image: © Mayte Piera; article: “House in Monasterios / Ramon Esteve” 09 May 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

* Residential Architecture: De Wet 34 House by SAOTA – Stefan Antoni Olmesdahl Truen Architects

Posted by the editors on Tuesday, 14 May 2013

De Wet 34 House by SAOTA – Stefan Antoni Olmesdahl Truen Architects

Residential Architecture: De Wet 34 House by SAOTA – Stefan Antoni Olmesdahl Truen Architects: “..The site is positioned in the heart of Bantry Bay in Cape Town, South Africa, on the slopes of Lion’s Head overlooking the bay. The brief was to create a home with all the spectacle of an Atlantic Seaboard showpiece but also to respond to the practical needs of family life and to create a feeling of sanctuary..Built over four floors, the living areas are open-plan yet have distinct identities. A minimalist weathered redwood and grey-shale street façade opens on to a sculptural arrival courtyard which in turn leads to an entrance gallery. Dramatic volume, far-reaching views, sculpture and raw textures – rock, timber, concrete – are the cornerstones of this house, designed to form a canvas for the setting and develop a patina over time..The Family room, placed on the mountain side of the courtyard garden, provides for cocooned living while the double volume Living and Dining area on the sea side is more dramatic, with its rippling concrete feature fireplace wall and commanding views. This ocean fronting section is a soaring space anchored by concrete and rock – a five-tonne cocktail bar of rough-hewn granite holds down one side of the living space. Although sea-oriented, with the pool terrace to the west, the main Living area also opens onto the courtyard garden on the east, with access to both by the way of sliding glass doors which open up so completely that it’s little more than a roofed outdoor space..One descends through a double volume ‘under water’ atrium to the Bedroom floor and down another level to the Guest and Playroom areas..The interiors create an emotional and sensory journey when moving through the house. Furnishings are minimal and lines are kept simple & neutral. By utilising a restrained and raw base of textures and finishes, the décor feels natural and subtly organic; the overall ambiance is one of calm and serenity. Colour is kept to a bare minimum; the interior works predominantly with a light and shade tonal range, allowing views of the mountain, the ocean and sky, and also the artwork to introduce colour..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, views; interesting form, interior volumes, details and materiality; indoor / outdoor sensibility..

See our posts on other homes by SAOTA:

designalog : contact

image: © Adam Letch; article: “De Wet 34 / SAOTA – Stefan Antoni Olmesdahl Truen Architects” 06 May 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Furniture, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Stone House in Anavissos by Whitebox Architects

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 5 May 2013

Stone House in Anavissos by Whitebox Architects

Residential Architecture: Stone House in Anavissos by Whitebox Architects: “..The concept was the creation of a residence for a family of four – the parents with two children – and the possibility of having a guest room with relative autonomy -separate bathroom. The basic demands were: the view of the sea from all four bedrooms, an office space on the ground floor for the professional needs of the couple but mostly of the mother who wanted to work and supervise the ground floor where the children would play. Another request for the design was the economy in energy consumption of the house and the possibility of enjoying the outdoor spaces throughout the year, for dining, swimming, games..The plot is located in Lakka, looking over the gulf of Anavissos. Undergrowth, rocky terrain with a gentle slope to the bay located southeast of the plot and strong northerly and easterly winds -local thermal effects, are the main features of the inhospitable natural environment..Morphology: The building is L-shaped thus protects the space of the main courtyard from the strong local winds while connecting the indoors spaces to the external functions of the residence. The ground floor is divided into two levels following the smooth slope to the sea. On the northwest side, while the indoor facilities are disrupted, the structural elements of the building are released from the main volume and continue their way until they form a protected from the north wind -with stone walls-, and the sun- with fixed wooden blinds – space..This area is the “secret” access of the family directly to the kitchen, the summer dining and rest area with shade and coolness. The secret garden of the children with a sculpture hidden behind the stone columns that barely leave the sunrays penetrate and reveal their secret. Pergolas on the south side of the house protect the inner space from the direct sunlight through the corner windows that are facing the sea. Inside the building there is an atrium with a mobile roof that slopes to the North to allow the northern light to enter and contributes to the hot air relief during the summer. It also contributes to the visual and audio communication of the residents on both floors..The semi-open space between the two children’s bedrooms that is in contact with the atrium gives children the opportunity to see inside the house from above while they are on their verandah. The northern side of the building creates a front to the north as there are only a few small openings, except one above the main entrance that even allows the view through the house to the buildings that lie behind. The wooden “sachnisi”is a historical reference to the greek refugees who migrated to the area from Asia Minor in 1922 and worked in the local salt marshes..Construction: The exterior walls of the building are made of 70cm bearing stone masonry, visible on the ground floor and plastered with colored plaster on the 1rst floor. The concrete used for slabs and columns remained visible inside and out. Great attention was given to the connection of the rough materials like stone and concrete with the other materials, wood, metal, glass, painted plaster..”  Interesting interior volumes and details; indoor / outdoor sensibility..

designalog : contact

image: © George Fakaros; article: “Stone House in Anavissos / Whitebox Architects” 30 Apr 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Omnibus House by Gubbins Arquitectos

Posted by the editors on Friday, 5 April 2013

Omnibus House by Gubbins Arquitectos

Residential Architecture:  Omnibus House by Gubbins Arquitectos: “..Chilean architect Pedro Gubbins designed this concrete residence as a rural retreat for himself and his family and has balanced it on top of a dry-stone wall..Named Omnibus House, the long and narrow residence is constructed on the side of a hill and the wall beneath it functions as a retainer against the sloping landscape..Gubbins wanted the house to be visually linked to the outdoor spaces of its woodland location, so he designed the concrete volume with lengths of glazing stretching across its longest facades, allowing views right through the building..”All the issues with privacy are solved because of the slope of the location,” said Jose Quintana Cabezas, an architect at Gubbins Arquitectos. “There are neighbours, but they are far away enough to not to have visual contact, plus all the tree trunks help.”..One of the most prominent features of the house is a concrete staircase that cuts through its centre, connecting the rooms on the main floor with an entrance on the storey below and a terrace on the rooftop..Corridors run along both sides of the building, while rooms are arranged in sequence between. Glazed partitions divide the living and dining rooms, either side of the staircase, while wooden boards separate the bedrooms at the western end..The concrete walls are exposed inside the building, plus polished concrete floors run through each room..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, forest views; interesting interior volumes with glass walls; interesting materiality, contextuality, details; visual sensibility; indoor / outdoor sensibility; lovely dry stone wall; 18-image slideshow in original article..

designalog : contact

image + article: Dezeen

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,836 other followers

%d bloggers like this: