Designalog

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Posts Tagged ‘Texas’

* Residential Architecture: Edgeland House by Bercy Chen Studio

Posted by the editors on Friday, 22 February 2013

Edgeland House by Bercy Chen Studio

Residential Architecture: Edgeland House by Bercy Chen Studio: “..In an increasingly generic and de-natured world, we are interested in producing architecture tuned to the specificity of a place. The Edgeland residence is commissioned by a science fiction writer enthralled with 21st century human habitation in the urban frontiers of abandoned industrial zones..Not unlike Col Charles Goodnight’s first dug out at the JA ranch in 19th century Texas, the design is inspired by the vernacular of the “pit house”, one of the oldest housing typology in North America used by Native Americans through the ages..This brownfield reclaim project minimized disturbance to the site, as the previous excavations to remove an old Chevron pipeline left a scar on the bluff, the two new green roofed wings sheltering each other from the sun is an attempt to heal the land by restoring the slope and bring wildlife back..This approach addresses the climate of central Texas, USA, and utilizes thermal capacity of earth to regulate temperature,  while the linear courtyard down the center allows fresh air to flow between the  bluff and the river below. The courtyard is a theater for observing migrating humming birds,  monarch butterflies, even ant colonies…etc,  heightening one’s awareness of nature in an urban setting..We collaborated with the Lady Bird Wildflower Center to reintroduce over 40 native species of wildflowers and grass to preserve the local ecosystem..”  Extensive glazing, natural light; interesting form, contextuality, interior volumes, indoor / outdoor sensibility; green roof..

See our posts on three other homes by Bercy Chen Studio:

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image: © Paul Bardagjy; article: “Edgeland House / Bercy Chen Studio” 13 Feb 2013. ArchDaily

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Interiors, Landscape Architecture, Residential Architecture, Sustainable Architecture, Sustainable Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Architecture: Perot Museum of Nature and Science by Morphosis

Posted by the editors on Friday, 30 November 2012

Architecture: Perot Museum of Nature and Science by Morphosis: “..Museums, armatures for collective societal experience and cultural expression, present new ways of interpreting the world. They contain knowledge, preserve information and transmit ideas; they stimulate curiosity, raise awareness and create opportunities for exchange. As instruments of education and social change, museums have the potential to shape our understanding of ourselves and the world in which we live..As our global environment faces ever more critical challenges, a broader understanding of the interdependence of natural systems is becoming more essential to our survival and evolution. Museums dedicated to nature and science play a key role in expanding our understanding of these complex systems..The new Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Victory Park will create a distinct identity for the Museum, enhance the institution’s prominence in Dallas and enrich the city’s evolving cultural fabric. Designed to engage a broad audience, invigorate young minds, and inspire wonder and curiosity in the daily lives of its visitors, the Museum will cultivate a memorable experience that will persist in the minds of its visitors and that will ultimately broaden individuals’ and society’s understanding of nature and science..The Museum will strive to achieve the highest standards of sustainability possible for a building of its type. High performance design and incorporation of state of the art technologies will yield a new building that will minimize its impact on the environment..This world class facility will inspire awareness of science through an immersive and interactive environment that actively engages visitors. Rejecting the notion of museum architecture as neutral background for exhibits, the new building itself becomes an active tool for science education. By integrating architecture, nature, and technology, the building demonstrates scientific principles and stimulates curiosity in our natural surroundings..The immersive experience of nature within the city begins with the visitor’s approach to the museum, which leads through two native Texas ecologies: a forest of large native canopy trees and a terrace of native desert xeriscaping. The xeriscaped terrace gently slopes up to connect with the museum’s iconic stone roof. The overall building mass is conceived as a large cube floating over the site’s landscaped plinth. An acre of undulating roofscape comprised of rock and native drought-resistant grasses reflects Dallas’s indigenous geology and demonstrates a living system that will evolve naturally over time..The intersection of these two ecologies defines the main entry plaza, a gathering and event area for visitors and an outdoor public space for the city of Dallas. From the plaza, the landscaped roof lifts up to draw visitors through a compressed space into the more expansive entry lobby. The topography of the lobby’s undulating ceiling reflects the dynamism of the exterior landscape surface, blurring the distinction between inside and outside, and connecting the natural with the manmade..Moving from the compressed space of the entry, a visitor’s gaze is drawn upward through the soaring open volume of the sky-lit atrium, the building’s primary light-filled circulation space, which houses the building’s stairs, escalators and elevators. From the ground floor, a series of escalators bring patrons though the atrium to the uppermost level of the museum. Patrons arrive at a fully glazed balcony high above the city, with a bird’s eye view of downtown Dallas. From this sky balcony, visitors proceed downward in a clockwise spiral path through the galleries. This dynamic spatial procession creates a visceral experience that engages visitors and establishes an immediate connection to the immersive architectural and natural environment of the museum..The path descending from the top floor through the museum’s galleries weaves in and out of the building’s main circulation atrium, alternately connecting the visitor with the internal world of the museum and with the external life of the city beyond. The visitor becomes part of the architecture, as the eastern facing corner of the building opens up towards downtown Dallas to reveal the activity within. The museum, is thus, a fundamentally public building – a building that opens up, belongs to and activates the city; ultimately, the public is as integral to the museum as the museum is to the city..”  Article includes excellent photos by the renowned architectural photographer Iwan Baan..

See our post on another project by Morphosis: Residential Architecture: The FLOAT House – Make it Right by Morphosis Architects.

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image: ©Iwan Baan, Courtesy of Morphosis; article: “Perot Museum of Nature and Science / Morphosis” 20 Nov 2012. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/295662&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Cultural Architecture, Design, Designalog, Museums | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Caruth Boulevard Residence by Tom Reisenbichler

Posted by the editors on Thursday, 15 November 2012

Residential Architecture: Caruth Boulevard Residence by Tom Reisenbichler: “..Architect Tom Reisenbichler has designed the Caruth Boulevard residence in Dallas, Texas, USA..In our world where many associate sustainable (green) design with a bohemian lifestyle, while others consider luxury wasteful, this house is designed to prove they are not exclusive. Integrated tightly into the large iconic trees on the site, this house uses traditional home proportions to blend with the neighborhood. The horizontal lines of the design tie the home to the land, while the roof and balcony reach into the trees making them integral to the home..The design concepts emphasize the entertaining lifestyle of the owner / architect, with open plans that integrate indoor and outdoor spaces. The first level uses a central core (wooden box) as the main organizing element around which public spaces flow. This LEED Gold designed home features many sustainable strategies, from photovoltaic solar panels and recycled materials to native plants that are drought tolerant, every detail of sustainability is considered..”  Extensive glazing, natural light; interesting form, materiality and interior volumes; contextual sensibility, sustainability..

image: Bret Janek; article: Contemporist

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Green Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture, Solar Design, Sustainable Architecture, Sustainable Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: West Lake Hills Residence by Specht Harpman

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 26 August 2012

Residential Architecture: West Lake Hills Residence by Specht Harpman: “..On a densely tree-covered site in the Austin, Texas, USA, exurb of West Lake Hills, Specht Harpman was tasked with the renovation and expansion of a modest 1970′s house. Much of the original internal structure was maintained, but the alterations sought to erase all visible traces of the original house..The primary goal of the new renovation and expansion was to preserve all of the site’s large twisting Live Oak trees while creating a new and open home that embraces the landscape and weaves itself around the existing trees..The primary mass of the house was lifted off the ground plane by creating a series of masonry walls that extend across the site to form interior and exterior rooms that frame views with the Live Oak trees beyond. The walls define family spaces on the lower level, while supporting a “floating box” of bedroom and private spaces above..Ceilings of the existing house were low. For the expansion spaces, the ceiling plane was maintained, but the floor was lowered to follow the contours of the site, creating a terraced interior landscape that gives height to rooms while maintaining a modest exterior expression..”  Interesting interior volumes; extensive glazing, natural light, views..

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image: © Casey Dunn; article: “West Lake Hills Residence / Specht Harpman” 24 Aug 2012. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/265765&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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