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Posts Tagged ‘The FLOAT House – Make it Right by Morphosis Architects’

* Architecture: Perot Museum of Nature and Science by Morphosis

Posted by the editors on Friday, 30 November 2012

Architecture: Perot Museum of Nature and Science by Morphosis: “..Museums, armatures for collective societal experience and cultural expression, present new ways of interpreting the world. They contain knowledge, preserve information and transmit ideas; they stimulate curiosity, raise awareness and create opportunities for exchange. As instruments of education and social change, museums have the potential to shape our understanding of ourselves and the world in which we live..As our global environment faces ever more critical challenges, a broader understanding of the interdependence of natural systems is becoming more essential to our survival and evolution. Museums dedicated to nature and science play a key role in expanding our understanding of these complex systems..The new Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Victory Park will create a distinct identity for the Museum, enhance the institution’s prominence in Dallas and enrich the city’s evolving cultural fabric. Designed to engage a broad audience, invigorate young minds, and inspire wonder and curiosity in the daily lives of its visitors, the Museum will cultivate a memorable experience that will persist in the minds of its visitors and that will ultimately broaden individuals’ and society’s understanding of nature and science..The Museum will strive to achieve the highest standards of sustainability possible for a building of its type. High performance design and incorporation of state of the art technologies will yield a new building that will minimize its impact on the environment..This world class facility will inspire awareness of science through an immersive and interactive environment that actively engages visitors. Rejecting the notion of museum architecture as neutral background for exhibits, the new building itself becomes an active tool for science education. By integrating architecture, nature, and technology, the building demonstrates scientific principles and stimulates curiosity in our natural surroundings..The immersive experience of nature within the city begins with the visitor’s approach to the museum, which leads through two native Texas ecologies: a forest of large native canopy trees and a terrace of native desert xeriscaping. The xeriscaped terrace gently slopes up to connect with the museum’s iconic stone roof. The overall building mass is conceived as a large cube floating over the site’s landscaped plinth. An acre of undulating roofscape comprised of rock and native drought-resistant grasses reflects Dallas’s indigenous geology and demonstrates a living system that will evolve naturally over time..The intersection of these two ecologies defines the main entry plaza, a gathering and event area for visitors and an outdoor public space for the city of Dallas. From the plaza, the landscaped roof lifts up to draw visitors through a compressed space into the more expansive entry lobby. The topography of the lobby’s undulating ceiling reflects the dynamism of the exterior landscape surface, blurring the distinction between inside and outside, and connecting the natural with the manmade..Moving from the compressed space of the entry, a visitor’s gaze is drawn upward through the soaring open volume of the sky-lit atrium, the building’s primary light-filled circulation space, which houses the building’s stairs, escalators and elevators. From the ground floor, a series of escalators bring patrons though the atrium to the uppermost level of the museum. Patrons arrive at a fully glazed balcony high above the city, with a bird’s eye view of downtown Dallas. From this sky balcony, visitors proceed downward in a clockwise spiral path through the galleries. This dynamic spatial procession creates a visceral experience that engages visitors and establishes an immediate connection to the immersive architectural and natural environment of the museum..The path descending from the top floor through the museum’s galleries weaves in and out of the building’s main circulation atrium, alternately connecting the visitor with the internal world of the museum and with the external life of the city beyond. The visitor becomes part of the architecture, as the eastern facing corner of the building opens up towards downtown Dallas to reveal the activity within. The museum, is thus, a fundamentally public building – a building that opens up, belongs to and activates the city; ultimately, the public is as integral to the museum as the museum is to the city..”  Article includes excellent photos by the renowned architectural photographer Iwan Baan..

See our post on another project by Morphosis: Residential Architecture: The FLOAT House – Make it Right by Morphosis Architects.

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image: ©Iwan Baan, Courtesy of Morphosis; article: “Perot Museum of Nature and Science / Morphosis” 20 Nov 2012. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/295662&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Cultural Architecture, Design, Designalog, Museums | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Architecture + Photography: New York After the Storm by Iwan Baan

Posted by the editors on Wednesday, 7 November 2012

Architecture + Photography:  New York After the Storm by Iwan Baan: “..this set of images by Dutch architectural photographer Iwan Baan shows the scene in New York over the past week as the city recovers from the effects of Hurricane Sandy that swept across Manhattan last Monday, cutting the electricity and flooding the streets and subways..Iwan Baan also photographed the city from the air, creating a striking photograph that made the cover of New York Magazine..The image shows part of the city in darkness, while the rest is is filled with light and colour. “It was the only way to show that New York was two cities, almost,” Baan told Poynter magazine. “One was almost like a third world country where everything was becoming scarce. Everything was complicated. And then another was a completely vibrant, alive New York.”..A week later the city is now getting back to normal, with power mostly restored, schools reopening and subways running again..Earlier this year Iwan Baan photographed a vertical slum in Venezuela for an exhibition that won the Golden Lion for best project at the Venice Architecture Biennale..”   Excellent, as are most of Iwan Baan’s photos..  Original article includes a 21-image slideshow..

See some of our posts with photos by Iwan Baan:

image: Iwan Baan; article: Dezeen

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Posted in Architecture, Architecture + Design, Awards, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Cultural Architecture, Design, Designalog, Exhibitions, Landscape Architecture, lighting, Photography, Public Architecture, Public Facilities, Public Parks, Slide Shows, Urban Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Architecture + Design: Dignifying Design

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 7 October 2012

Architecture + Design: Dignifying Design: “..(A) new breed of public-interest designers proceeds from a belief that everybody deserves good design, whether in a prescription bottle label that people can more easily read and understand, a beautiful pocket park to help a city breathe or a less stressful intake experience at the emergency room. Dignity may be to the burgeoning field of public-interest design as justice is to the more established public-interest law..” Excellent, inspirational, motivational article on public-interest design and architecture in The New York Times..

The article includes a 9-image slideshow, here.

See some of other posts with photos by the excellent architectural photographer Iwan Baan:

image: Iwan Baan; article: John Cary and Courtney E. Martin, The New York Times

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Articles, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Cultural Architecture, Design, Designalog, Educational Architecture, Humanitarian Design, Infrastructure Architecture, Institutional Architecture, Photography, Product Design, Public Architecture, Public Facilities, Social Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

* Residential Architecture: The FLOAT House – Make it Right by Morphosis Architects

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 4 August 2012

Residential Architecture: The FLOAT House – Make it Right by Morphosis Architects: “..The FLOAT House is a new kind of house: a house that can sustain its own water and power needs; a house that can survive the floodwaters generated by a storm the size of Hurricane Katrina; and perhaps most importantly, a house that can be manufactured cheaply enough to function as low-income housing..Make It: Affordable: A new approach to mass-producing low-cost homes that respond to local culture and climate..The FLOAT House optimizes the efficiency of mass-production, while respecting New Orleans’s unique culture and context. The Ninth Ward’s colorful vernacular houses, which local residents have traditionally modified and personalized over time, reflect the community’s vibrant culture. The FLOAT House grows out of the indigenous typology of the shotgun house, predominant throughout New Orleans and the Lower Ninth Ward. Like a typical shotgun house, the FLOAT House sits atop a raised base. This innovative base, or “chassis,” integrates all mechanical, electrical, plumbing and sustainable systems, and securely floats in case of flooding. Inspired by GM’s skateboard chassis, which is engineered to support several car body types, the FLOAT House’s chassis is designed to support a variety of customizable house configurations..Developed to meet the needs of families in New Orleans’s Lower Ninth Ward, the FLOAT House is a prototype for prefabricated, affordable housing that can be adapted to the needs of flood zones worldwide. The FLOAT House is assembled on-site from pre-fabricated components:

  • The modular chassis is pre-fabricated as a single unit of expanded polystyrene foam coated in glass fiber reinforced concrete, with all required wall anchors, electrical, mechanical and plumbing systems pre-installed. The chassis module is shipped whole from factory to site, via standard flat bed trailer.
  • The piers that anchor the house to the ground and the concrete pads on which the chassis sits are constructed on-site, using local labor and conventional construction techniques.
  • The panelized walls, windows, interior finishes and kit-of parts roof are prefabricated, to be assembled on-site along with the installation of fixtures and appliances. This efficient approach integrates modern mass-production with traditional site construction to lower costs, guarantee quality, and reduce waste.

Make It: Float: A flood-safe house that securely floats with rising water levels..Global climate change is triggering ever-harsher floods and natural disasters. Nearly 200 million people worldwide live in high risk coastal flooding zones , and in the US alone, over 36 million people currently face the threat of flooding. The FLOAT House prototype proposes a sustainable way of living that adapts to this uncertain reality..To protect from flooding, the FLOAT House can rise vertically on guide posts, securely floating up to twelve feet as water levels rise. In the event of a flood, the house’s chassis acts as a raft, guided by steel masts, which are anchored to the ground by two concrete pile caps each with six 45-foot deep piles..Like the vernacular New Orleans shotgun house, the FLOAT House sits on a 4-foot base; rather than permanently raising the house on ten foot or higher stilts, the house only rises in case of severe flooding. This configuration accommodates a traditional front porch, preserving of the community’s vital porch culture and facilitating accessibility for elderly and disabled residents..While not designed for occupants to remain in the home during a hurricane, the FLOAT House aims to minimize catastrophic damage and preserve the homeowner’s investment in their property. This approach also allows for the early return of occupants in the aftermath of a hurricane or flood..Make It: Green: A high-performance house that generates and sustains its own water and power needs..On track for a LEED Platinum Rating, the FLOAT House is an innovative model for affordable, net-zero annual energy consumption housing. High-performance systems sustain the home’s power, air, and water needs, and minimize resource consumption:

  • Solar Power Generation: The roof supports solar panels that generate all of the house’s power, resulting in net-zero annual energy consumption. The chassis incorporates electrical systems to store and convert solar power for daily use, and to give back to the electrical grid during the temperate fall and spring months.
  • Rainwater Collection: The sloped concave roof collects rainwater, and funnels it to cisterns housed in the chassis, where it is filtered and stored for daily use.
  • Efficient Systems—including low-flow plumbing fixtures, low-energy appliances, high performance windows, and highly insulated SIPs (Structural Insulated Panel) walls and roof—minimize water and power consumption, and lower the lifecycle cost for the home owner.
  • High-grade energy efficient kitchen, appliances and fixtures maximize durability and reduce the need for replacement.
  • Geothermal Heating and Cooling: A geothermal mechanical system heats and cools the air via a ground source heat pump, which naturally conditions the air, minimizing the energy required to cool the house in the harsh summer months and heat it in winter..

See our post on another home for Make It Right for post-Katrina New Orleans: Residential Architecture: Duplex by Frank Gehry for Make it Right.

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image: © Iwan Baan; article: “The FLOAT House – Make it Right / Morphosis Architects” 02 Aug 2012. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/259629&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Green Design, Humanitarian Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture, Social Architecture, Solar Design, Sustainable Architecture, Sustainable Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

 
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