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Posts Tagged ‘Staircases’

* Residential Architecture: The Glass House by AR Design Studio

Posted by the editors on Saturday, 18 May 2013

The Glass House by AR Design Studio

Residential Architecture: The Glass House by AR Design Studio: “..AR Design Studio have completed a glass extension on a house in Winchester, England, UK..it is not every day that a body is found buried on your building site, but on a summer’s morning in 2012 this is exactly what happened while builders were laying foundations for RIBA award-winning architects AR Design Studio’s latest project. By 6pm they had found another 2..After the initial astonishment, the Police and later a team of Archaeologists were brought in who thankfully identified the remains as being of Roman origin. After a period of intense excavation, it was confirmed as a site of Archaeological importance when further evidence of Roman burials and defensive fortifications were uncovered, including the discovery of a rare Roman burial urn. Once the site was cleared of artefacts and the bodies taken to the local museum for research, work on the building could continue..These ancient findings further added to the already rich historical context of the property situated in the town of Winchester, the old Roman capital of England. The project was to convert the original servants’ quarters of the large Manor House that overlooked the surrounding grasslands. It was built by the Earl of Airlie in 1856 while he served as Camp Commandant at the nearby Peninsular Barracks military base and split into two more modestly sized dwellings in the 1950s..Since then, the servants’ quarters had fallen into a state of disrepair after the unfortunate passing of a sole elderly owner. It remained vacant for a number of years, until the long-time occupants of the Manor House sought to retire and move into the more manageable servants’ quarters and turn it into their dream home..The owner’s love of glass fuelled their brief to construct a beautifully simple sculptural glass staircase and a contemporary glass extension, situated at the rear of the property in the space created by the ‘C’ shape of the building, which would open itself up to the garden..The couple approached AR Design Studio Chartered Architects because of their experience in dealing with glass architecture and their interest in how this material can be used to create seamless relationships between inside and outside space, between the man-made and nature..Hidden from view behind the buildings traditional façade, the finished extension is an elegant piece of modern contemporary glass architecture. It completely reinvents the feel and atmosphere of the previously dark and cramped servants’ quarters; all within the rich and poignant historical context of the site..The concept was to provide a clean and light architectural intervention alongside the traditional shell of the building which would positively affect the feel and functionality of the property. The spaces are designed to accentuate a play between light and dark; contrasting from the bright and open communal spaces to the more subtle and secluded, almost cave-like retreat spaces in the old house. The existing layout was clarified; vertical voids were cut through the house to unite the cellar, ground and first floors and redirect the flow of the house to naturally draw the user towards the new glass space at the heart of the home..This extremely light and spacious frameless glass extension houses the open-plan kitchen, living and dining areas. As the delicate structure reaches over to form the walls and roof of the extension, it creates a flexible inside/outside space allowing sunlight to flood through the home and filter down gradually, creating beautiful shards of light and shadow..As a contrast to the extension, the formal lounge, study and dining room have a more sheltered and embracing nature. Upstairs, the Glass House has 4 large double bedrooms, each with an en-suite bathroom. The master suite has its own walk-in wardrobe and views overlooking the garden and the top of the glass extension below. All the essentials have been accounted for, in the form of utility and laundry rooms, study and WC that flank the glass box..The strategic placement of the large roof light floods the entrance hall with sunlight that tracks through the double-height space with the time of day and the seasons. Timber ceramic tiling was used as an innovative alternative to traditional timber flooring because it does not discolour in the weather and is a perfect surface to compliment the underfloor heating throughout. This allowed for a seamless floor finish running from the inside to the outside onto the cantilevered patio..The rest of the house is finished to a minimal and clean appearance to allow the functional glass structures to stand out as exquisite pieces of sculptural art in their own right..Whilst still retaining a subtle street appearance, the finished property now renamed Clarkes, is completely transformed from its previous gloomy and decrepit nature. The modern renovation and extension creates a light, airy and open living environment bursting with traditional values, contemporary style and innovative design..”  Extensive glazing, naturally enough, and abundant natural light, garden views; interesting renovation and addition to an existing structure..

See our posts on three other homes by AR Design Studio:

image: Martin Gardner; article: Contemporist

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Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Awards, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Queenscliff Residence by John Wardle Architects

Posted by the editors on Sunday, 12 May 2013

Queenscliff Residence by John Wardle Architects

Residential Architecture: Queenscliff Residence by John Wardle Architects: “..This house acts as an optical instrument, a series of devices that frame views beyond the abutting foreshore to the south toward the Heads of Port Phillip Bay (Queenscliff, Victoria, Australia).  The most significant promenade through the site, and house itself, takes you from the street along a gently stepped path to the entry stair which then elevates you sufficiently to appreciate the view as you arrive at the uppermost level.  The careful choreography of this sequence is amplified by materiality and adjacencies.  Fine timber detailing alongside the path, woven wicker within the stair and Calacatta marble in the kitchen.  The experience on entry is private and cocooned from the exterior.  Once above, the views expand and are focussed on the horizon of the ocean to the south..A challenge for Victorian coastal houses is to reconcile the southern views with northern solar orientation. In this instance, a courtyard has been introduced to gain northern aspect to the living spaces and to capture the afternoon sun within an environment shielded from the strong southerlies. The principal bedroom is oriented south stealing ocean views through the main living pavilion and across the courtyard..The house is carefully zoned to allow for privacy between parents and adult children on a narrow site. The main living and dining space is where family and friends come together. In this way, the house is designed for a busy family life, allowing for both privacy and communal gathering.. The direct visual connection between the interior and the sea encourages the contemplation of ships crossing the Heads en route to distant ports, a relaxing retreat from work..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, astounding sea views; interesting form, timber cladding and screening, interior volumes, materiality, contextuality..

See our post on another home by John Wardle Architects: Residential Architecture: Shearers’ Quarters House by John Wardle Architects

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image: © Trevor Mein; article: “Queenscliff Residence / John Wardle Architects” 07 May 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Furniture, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, lighting, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

* Residential Architecture: 128G Cairnhill Road by RichardHO Architects

Posted by the editors on Friday, 26 April 2013

128G Cairnhill Road by RichardHO Architects

Residential Architecture: 128G Cairnhill Road by RichardHO Architects: “..Our initial survey of the property revealed the building’s good bones. The house’s original condition was quite good but its configuration did not suit modern living. A primary concern was that the kitchen and bathrooms were located at the back of the house, away from activities of the living and dining rooms and inappropriate for entertaining..We retained the building envelope and reconfigured the layout to create a single, seamless living-dining-kitchen volume, taking special care to maintain the hierarchy of space so central to the design of pre-war shop house. The resultant scheme is a distinctly modern take on a traditional shop house. It received an instant stamp of approval from the owners. “I love the fact that when you enter, you can see straight through the back, but know that the various areas are designed for specific purposes,” says the owner..To recreate the shop house essence, we redefined two characteristic features of shop house architecture – the skylight and the air well. To emphasise the importance of this space as the fulcrum of the house, we introduced a water feature and koi pond and made the staircase wind around this water feature. Where the air well was once exposed to the elements, it is now equipped with a retractable glass roof and independently operated blinds that reflect 75 percent of the heat back into the atmosphere, keeping the internal temperature comfortable. Depending on the extent to which the blinds are retracted, the time of the day and the intensity of the sun, the shaft of light streaming in casts shadows in varied patterns. On moonlit nights, the glass roof can be fully retracted to take in the view..The second storey has one wing housing the master bedroom and ensuite bathroom, and the other containing the nursery and daughter’s bedroom. We custom-designed and installed a series of child safety doors at strategic locations, which can be removed once the owner’s daughter comes of age. The master bedroom is a self contained volume reminiscent of a luxury hotel suite: a divider at the entrance doubles up as the bed’s headboard, while a bank of wardrobe in a high-gloss white finish lines walls on either side. The piece de resistance is the master bathroom, with its view of lush greenery that whisks one away from the hustle and bustle of city life..The guest room on the attic level functions as the owners study when there are no visitors. Here, an enormous 4m high glass door and glass wall are used in place of the usual timber and brick counterparts. We wanted to enhance the sense of space. If you open the door, air can flow through and ventilate the space. Our rationale resonated well with the client, who picked this as his favourite room in the house. The room is large with high ceilings and a real ‘loft’ feel. “Sitting at my desk, I can look down into the kitchen and my family room”, says the owner. A surprise awaits intrepid visitors who make the journey all the way up to the rooftop: an outdoor terrace with an infinity edge pool and a panorama of green, the same view shared by the master bathroom..This is one of the most contemporary shop houses we have done so far. But it has the unmistakable feel of a shop house, because we do not believe in creating space in a conserved house that do not have memories of its past. It would be like a person with amnesia. The owner agrees. “I love the clean feel and while the house is very modern, there is no question about its origins:, he says. Asked if the house suits his family’s needs, the owner replies, “Very much so. There are spaces we can do things as a family, and there are spaces we can do things separately. It is great for entertaining but also quite intimate at the same time.”..”   Extensive glazing, natural light, privacy, garden views; interesting interior volumes, details; historical, social and contextual sensibility..

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image: © Vineyard Production; article: “128G Cairnhill Road / RichardHO Architects” 17 Apr 2013. ArchDaily

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Design & Decoration, Designalog, Interior Decoration, Interior Design, Interiors, Residential Architecture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

* Residential Architecture: Pangal Cabin by EMa Arquitectos

Posted by the editors on Friday, 16 November 2012

Residential Architecture: Pangal Cabin by EMa Arquitectos: “..The house is located on the top of a slope site of 5000 sq. meters, characterize by local trees like Quillayes, Cactus and Espinos. The principal views points to the valley and ravines oriented to the north..The assignment was to generate a refuge, efficient and simple, from the beginning of the construction process to his after use. The requirements to generate the project are basically the access, the implant of the house, the terrace and the pool, that were condicionated by the local vegetation of the place, trying not to intervene the natural field. For these reason the house was design in pilotis and a 40 meters gangway that connect the access with the house. Spatially, it must take advantage of the existing views, incorporating natural light and solar energy, without losing his privacy and sense of reception..The house is divided in two areas maintaining spacial continuous, using the Quillay tree as a reference of the site to design the house. That is why the social and services spaces where situated in a higher volume, orientating views through the north-est, and the dormitory was located in a smaller space oriented to the north for more privacy..The structure is made of steel, chosen because of its faster construction and versatility.. Coverings are made of wood, we used horizontal tongue and groove joint with dark tint for exteriors and plywood treated on albayalde for interiors. In both cases the idea was to generate an economic solution, natural and neutral condition, in response to the exterior and interior space. To improve the thermic comfort we use projected polyurethane insulation according to the climate of the place..The pool of 2 x 10 and 1.2 meters deep was implanted according to the natural characteristics of the site. It communicates through the terraces with housing and corresponds to an extension of it. The roofs of both volumes are the fifth facade for multiplying situations, routes and views in contrast to the small dimension house..The whole North West facade views are focus to the valley framing the view in one unique space. This makes you to be part of the environment from the interior of the house. Our objective was to develop a home friendly place and away from pretensions..”  Extensive glazing, natural light, views; interesting materiality, interior volumes and details..

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image: © Marcelo Cáceres; article: Cifuentes , Fabian . “Pangal Cabin / EMa Arquitectos” 13 Nov 2012. ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/293085&gt;

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture + Design, Contemporary Architecture, contemporary design, Design, Designalog, Interiors, Residential Architecture, Solar Design, Sustainable Design | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

 
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